2022 Endorsements


Current Members of Congress

Endorsed Incumbents Running for Re-Election in 2022

These candidates endorsed by the PAC have demonstrated their solidarity with the atheist and humanist community by supporting measures to protect the separation of church and state, remove the lingering bias against nontheists, and uphold scientific integrity in education, research, and public policy. The endorsed incumbents are: Rep. Donald Beyer (VA-8), Rep. Julia Brownley (CA-26), Rep. Sean Casten (IL-6), Rep. Steve Cohen (TN-9), Rep. Danny K. Davis (IL-7), Rep. Jimmy Gomez (CA-34), Rep. Jared Huffman (CA-2), Rep. Pramila Jayapal (WA-7), Rep. Hank Johnson (GA-4), Rep. Dan Kildee (MI-8), Rep. Zoe Lofgren (CA-18), Rep. Carolyn Maloney (NY-12), Rep. Jerry Nadler (NY-12), Rep. Eleanor Holmes Norton (DC-AtL), Rep. Mark Pocan (WI-2), Rep. Jamie Raskin (MD-8), Rep. Rashida Tlaib (MI-12), and Rep. Susan Wild (PA-7). In an unfortunate New York Supreme Court redistricting decision, Jerry Nadler and Carolyn Maloney were forced to run against each other in the Democratic party primary on August 23, 2022 for New York’s 12th Congressional District. The Congress can ill-afford to lose either of these excellent public servants. Congratulations to Congressman Nadler on his primary victory on 8/23 and thank you to Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney for her years of public service. All the other endorsed incumbents won re-election.

Federal, State & Local Endorsements

Freethought Equality Fund Endorsed Candidates

As a federal political action committee, the focus of the Freethought Equality Fund is Congressional candidates; however, running for – and winning – state and local seats is essential to increasing the visibility and political clout of the atheist and humanist community. The Freethought Equality Fund is proud to endorse secular candidates in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming for the 2022 elections.

Alabama

John “Jack” Slate

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Alabama-2)

John “Jack” Slate ran for Congress in Alabama’s 2nd District. He withdrew from the race prior to the Democratic primary. Born and raised in Alabama, and an Auburn University graduate, Slate is working to build a progressive community-focused campaign to “give the people of Alabama a brighter future.” He is also a recent graduate of the University of Chicago, where he based his master’s thesis on the dangers posed to our democracy by the January 6th insurrection. His policy priorities include building a sustainable economy by employing technological innovations and embracing green energy, reforming the criminal justice system by investing in mental healthcare and expanding drug treatment programs, expanding medicare and medicaid to include vision and dental and investing in preventative care, tackling the affordable housing crisis with significant federal investments to increase the housing supply, addressing gun violence, and ending the federal prohibition on cannabis. Slate is spiritual but not religious.

Arizona

Jeanne Casteen

Ran for: Arizona State Senate (District 2)

Jeanne Casteen ran for the Arizona State Senate in District 2, earning 48% of the vote in the general election. As a parent, educator, and former school board president, Casteen has seen firsthand how policies at the state level have created a two-tier education system that hurt entire communities. She is a champion for improving the quality of public education, addressing the teacher shortage, and directing attention towards food insecurity. In addition to advocating for investments in public education, Casteen is passionate about affordable housing, civil rights, criminal justice reform, fair wages, and immigration reform. She is the executive director of the Secular Coalition for Arizona, which represents the Arizona nontheist community and advocates for public policy free of religious preference. Casteen is an atheist.

Sanda Clark

Ran for: Arizona House of Representatives (District 19)

Sanda Clark ran for the Arizona House of Representatives in District 19, earning 26% of the vote in the general election. A refugee from Romania, Clark’s family came to the United States to escape communism. She studied music and in America she was able to fulfill her dream to become a concert pianist. Having recently retired, she is now doing “one of the most American things possible” running for public office. Clark is passionate about resolving the issues that threaten rural Arizona by pushing for a sustainable water policy, being a champion for reproductive rights and voting rights, investing in public education, and adopting a humane and comprehensive immigration policy that creates a path for U.S. citizenship. Clark is not religious, as she says “music was and is my religion.”

Delina DiSanto

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Arizona-4)

Delina DiSanto ran for Congress in the Arizona 4th Congressional District. DiSanto is seeking to oust incumbent Paul Gosar. She says, “He is a traitor and a white supremacist, and he does not belong in Congress.” DiSanto is a registered nurse, small business owner, and mom. She cares deeply about healthcare. She says, “Everyone has the right to affordable care – it is our moral obligation as a country to provide healthcare and I view it as a human right. I support the path to Medicare for all.” Her other policy priorities include: protecting Social Security, addressing climate change, immigration reform to secure the border while protecting Dreamers and creating an understandable and less intimidating path for citizenship, respecting our veterans by creating exception healthcare and other services at the VA, cutting taxes for small businesses and making investments in our infrastructure, increasing teacher pay and benefits to improve public education, and decriminalizing marijuana. DiSanto is a recovering Catholic.

Melody Hernandez

Won: Arizona House of Representatives (District 8)

Melody Hernandez won re-election to the Arizona State House in District 8, earning 32% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). Since assuming office in January 2021, Hernandez has worked tirelessly to ensure that her constituents receive better public education, additional resources for educators, access to quality healthcare, support for unionization, and much more. She currently serves in both the House Judiciary Committee and the Military Affairs and Public Safety Committee. Having worked as a paramedic during the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, Hernandez gained firsthand experience as to how “community action and shared struggle to take care of our families and helping one another” ultimately represents what it means to be American. Hernandez is an agnostic.

Jennifer Longdon

Won: Arizona House of Representatives (District 5)

Jennifer Longdon won re-election to the Arizona House of Representatives in District 5, earning 40% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). She won the Democratic primary on August 2 – five candidates for two seats. Paralyzed by a random drive-by shooting in 2004, Longdon is a national advocate in the effort to improve the lives of people with disabilities and to prevent gun violence. Her goal is to dismantle the generational and systemic sexist, racist, and ableist oppression that prevents access to full equality for many in the disabled, black, indigenous, trans, and other marginalized communities. If re-elected, Longdon will continue to “fight for an Arizona that is equitable and accessible, for public education that serves ALL our children, for reproductive justice and gender-affirming healthcare that includes access to abortion, for an economy that works for ALL Arizonans, and for communities safe from gun violence.” Longdon is an atheist.

Juan Mendez

Won: Arizona State Senate (District 8)

Juan Mendez won re-election to the Arizona State Senate in District 8, earning 63% of the vote. With a lifelong commitment to social justice and a passion for politics, Mendez is committed to building strong communities. On the City of Phoenix Human Services Advisory Committee he worked to improve senior and family service centers and programs for the homeless. In addition, he managed the nonprofit Community Voice Mail to connect people living in poverty and experiencing homelessness with jobs, housing, and hope. In the Arizona State Senate, he serves on the Transportation and Government Committees and is the elected chair of the Arizona Legislative Latino Caucus. Mendez is working for “a government that works to make people successful — instead of a government that works for special interests.” Mendez is an atheist.

Scott Podeyn

Ran for: Arizona House of Representatives (District 29)

Scott Podeyn ran for the Arizona House of Representatives in District 29, earning 29% of the vote in the general eleciton. Podeyn retired from the U.S. Air Force after 20 years of service. In both his military and civilian life he has been guided by the Air Force value of “service before self” with honesty, honor, and integrity. The current political climate has compelled him to come out of retirement to again fight against anti-democratic and anti-American forces. He says, “the U.S. Constitution provides for equality under the law and does not make exceptions for race, ethnicity, sex, sexual identity, or gender identity. The separation of church and state must also be maintained not only in our laws but also with elected officials leaving their religion at the front door.” In addition, he will advocate for water conservation efforts and gun violence prevention. Podeyn is an agnostic.

Athena Salman

Won: Arizona House of Representatives (District 8)

Athena Salman won re-election to the Arizona State House in District 8, earning 31% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). Born to a working-class family, Salman understands the struggles of food insecurity and not having access to proper healthcare, quality education, and livable wages. She is a strong advocate in the House for bringing due attention towards the economically disadvantaged. Salman successfully passed a law to guarantee feminine hygiene products to women in prison and to end the shackling of pregnant people. Salman takes pride in serving her community by advocating for progressive policies such as ensuring the integrity of elections, establishing paid sick leave, and increasing accessibility of healthcare and public education for her constituents. Salman is an atheist.

Judy Schwiebert

Won: Arizona House of Representatives (District 2)

Judy Schwiebert won re-election to the Arizona State House in District 2, earning 35% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). The daughter of an educator and a 27-year veteran teacher herself, Schwiebert has seen firsthand the inequalities within the Arizona public school system and how hardworking educators are overwhelmed and undervalued in the community. Schwiebert is a staunch advocate for her constituents and has sought to address issues relating to increasing the quality of education, expanding access to affordable healthcare, and fostering a strong economy for students and families to thrive in. She is also the co-founder of Theater Works, a community theater that makes the performing arts accessible to people of all backgrounds and interests. Schwiebert is an ally to the atheist and humanist community.

Stephanie Stahl Hamilton

Won: Arizona House of Representatives (District 21)

Stephanie Stahl Hamilton won election to the Arizona State House in District 21, earning 31% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). She won the Democratic primary on August 2 – three candidates running for two seats. A state senator, community advocate, and progressive Presbyterian minister, Hamilton works to prevent “Christian nationalism from seeping into our state statues” by passing legislation that prohibits discrimination on the basis of religion, as well as, investing in public education and extending more attention and resources to improving public school curriculum. In addition to promoting a fully funded, quality public education system and ending the state’s school voucher program, her policy priorities include protecting the environment, enacting sensible gun safety laws, expanding access to affordable healthcare, and protecting reproductive rights. Hamilton is a strong ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Arkansas

Judson Scanlon

Ran for: Arkansas State House (District 70)

Judson Scanlon ran for election to the Arkansas House of Representatives to represent District 70, earning 43% of the vote in the general election. Scanlon’s political advocacy career started in Washington State working to reverse an anti-gay initiative, and since then, they have continued to work on campaigns in 28 different states before moving back to Arkansas. Scanlon has served on many local, state, and national organizations, including as National LGBTQ Outreach Director for Bernie 2016 and as the Executive Director of Emerge Arkansas. Their priority issues include fully funding public education, protecting access to contraceptives and health care, and providing a social safety net for vulnerable communities in Arkansas. Scanlon is a person of faith and a firm believer in the separation of church and state.

Chenoa Summers

Ran for: Arkansas State Senate (District 20)

Chenoa Summers ran the Arkansas State Senate in District 20, earning 38% of the vote in the general election. Summers is a student research assistant in a botany lab at Arkansas State University, where she is earning a degree in biology with emphasis in botany. This will be her fifth degree having earned degrees in general education, natural sciences, physics, and environmental science. Her campaign received the endorsement of 314 Action, whose mission is to elect scientists to public office. Summers policy priorities include: fighting against book bans at libraries and our public schools, expanding Medicaid, increasing funding for public television, defending women’s and LGBTQIA+ rights, making birth control more accessible, and addressing climate change. Summers is an atheist.

California

Sara Aminzadeh

Ran for: California State Assembly (District 12)

Sara Aminzadeh ran for the California Assembly in District 12, earning 48% of the vote in the general election. She finished 2nd of four candidates in the top-two primary on June 7 with 35% of the vote, to move on to the general election. Aminzadeh has devoted more than 20 years advocating for clean water and fighting climate change, including serving as a California Coastal Commissioner. As a member of the California Assembly, she will work with her constituents and colleagues in the legislature to tackle everyday problems with strategies that improve the quality of life and make the community more inclusive and equitable, while effectively addressing the pressing issues of today. She says, “I will confront critical issues such as wildfire prevention, rising sea levels, housing affordability, and services for families with the urgency these issues demand. I will work to ensure every family has access to good quality jobs, affordable healthcare, and mental health support to help us all get through these challenging times.” Aminzadeh is an atheist.

James Coleman

Ran for: California State Assembly (District 21)

James Coleman ran for the California State Assembly in District 21. Earning 9% of the vote in the June 7 top-two primary, he finished 4th in a field of seven candidates. Coleman grew up in a working class family that profoundly shaped his values. He studied Human Developmental and Regenerative Biology and worked in a neuroscience lab. Coleman is the youngest and first openly LGBTQ+ member of the South San Francisco City Council. He entered politics because “our government can’t just work for the wealthy and well connected, it has to work for everyone.” His policy priorities include: implementing a wealth tax on billionaires and corporations, providing universal childcare and preschool, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, creating truly affordable housing, ensuring access to affordable and quality healthcare with Medicare for All, and taking aggressive action to beat back climate change. Coleman is an agnostic.

Alex Lee

Won: California State Assembly (District 24)

Alex Lee won re-election to the California State Assembly in District 24, earning 68% of the vote in the general election. He finished 1st of five candidates in the top-two primary on June 7 with 40% of the vote, and will move on to the general election. Since his first day in office, Lee has challenged the entrenched special interests “to put an end to the structural inequity that has led to our state’s most pressing challenges and has stalled our most important solutions.” He says, “Only by putting people and policy first can we achieve a California that is equitable and prosperous for all.” His policy priorities include: banning corporate contributions to political campaigns, creating more affordable housing and protecting tenant rights, establishing universal health care and cracking down on predatory health fees and charges, increasing investment in K-12 public schools and creating tuition-free college for Californians, combating climate change through the California Green New Deal, expanding bike infrastructure and mass transit, and increasing transparency within government for the digital era. Lee is an agnostic.

Brian Nash

Ran for: California State Senate (District 32)

Brian Nash ran for the California State Senate in District 32, earning 38% of the vote in the general election. He finished 2nd of two candidates in the top-two primary on June 7 with 40% of the vote, and will move on to the general election. Brian is a self-described punk-kid-turned-MBA-graduate, enjoys listening to punk rock, basketball, helping sea turtles, and working in the finance industry to “help people identify their strengths, and get the training or education they need to succeed.” He is running for office to apply his punk values and corporate experience “to fight back against the fascist faction of the Republican Party, and to fight for a fairer, more equitable country.” His policy priorities include: addressing climate change, ensuring access to affordable, high quality healthcare, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, assuring access to safe, affordable housing for all, and investing in local infrastructure to meet the challenges of today, and preparing for the needs of tomorrow. Nash was raised Catholic, but is not religious now.

Rob Rennie

Ran for: California State Senate (District 28)

Rob Rennie ran for the California State Assembly in District 28. Earning 25% of the vote in the June 7 top-two primary, he finished 3rd in a field of four candidates. Rennie is the Mayor of Los Gatos and has served on the Town Council since 2014. He is a small business owner with 25 years of experience in the semiconductor industry including developing products to improve solar energy technology. Rennie is seeking to apply his engineering mind-set to bring innovative solutions to critical issues like: preventing and mitigating wildfires, increasing the supply of affordable housing, mobilizing services to transition the unhoused from parks and public spaces into homes, addressing climate change, funding strategic infrastructure projects, and making children’s health and education a top priority. Rennie is an agnostic.

Joe Thompson

Ran for: California State Assembly (District 28)

Joe Thompson ran for the California State Assembly in District 28. Earning 10% of the vote in the June 7 top-two primary, he finished 4th in a field of four candidates. Thompson is a Starbucks Union Organizer, housing, and community activist who is “running for State Assembly to serve those who are in the most need. I am running to give my generation, and future generations, a voice so they are able to live a more prosperous life.” Their policy priorities include: addressing inflation with rent control and price caps on gasoline and other goods subject to price gouging, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, supporting workers’ right to organize and holding union-busting companies accountable, enacting a single-payer Medicare For All healthcare option, rooting out corruption with more transparency in government, creating affordable housing and ending the criminalization of homelessness, and redirecting resources from fossil fuel energy to clean, renewable energy. Thompson is spiritual but not religious.

Jon Wizard

Ran for: California State Assembly (District 30)

Jon Wizard ran for the California State Assembly in District 30. Earning 10% of the vote in the June 7 top-two primary, he finished 3rd in a field of five candidates. As a former firefighter, police officer, and 911 emergency dispatcher, Jon has spent his life as a first responder and public servant. He is currently a member of the Seaside City Council, where he has played an instrumental role in providing housing for teachers, nurses, seniors, and veterans; protecting and increasing the supply of water resources; and creating pathways to empower young people who choose the skilled trades and technical professions instead of college. He is running for the Assembly “to be a voice for the individuals and families working to achieve the California Dream: that working hard and helping your neighbor should be enough to build a dignified life for you and your family.” His policy priorities include: supporting the creation of more housing that is affordable, investing in childcare and public education, creating better and more accessible economic opportunities for people from all walks of life, ensuring access to affordable and quality healthcare, and addressing the drastic effects of climate change. Wizard was raised Baptist and is now an atheist.

Colorado

Judy Amabile

Won: Colorado State House (District 49)

Judy Amabile won re-election to the Colorado State House in District 49, earning 64% of the vote in the general election. As an entrepreneur, employer, mother, and hardworking community activist, Amabile is known for creative problem solving, open-mindedness, and pragmatism. She is skilled at bringing people together, building consensus, and getting things done. Her policy priorities include paying a living wage and providing paid family leave, addressing climate change and curtailing the power of the oil and gas industry, transitioning to a single payer healthcare system and advancing effective treatment for people with mental illness, and strengthening societal pillars of housing, education, transportation, union safeguards, criminal justice, internet access, and banking fairness to solve economic injustices. Amabile is a recovering Catholic and an atheist.

Chris Kennedy

Won: Colorado State House (District 30)

Chris Kennedy won re-election to the Colorado State House in District 30, earning 66% of the vote in the general election. Kennedy left his first career as a structural engineer because he became increasingly concerned about political issues facing his state and country. He started working on campaigns and at the Colorado State Capitol before running for office himself in 2016. Kennedy is “committed to making sure every Coloradan who works hard and does their fair share has every opportunity to succeed and build a life here. For me, that means investing in education and infrastructure, working to make health care and housing more affordable, supporting the long struggle for equal rights for everybody, and protecting our air, water, and land for the next generation.” He serves as Chair of the Committee on State, Civic, Military & Veterans Affairs and is a member of the Health & Insurance and the Legislative Council Committees. Raised without religion in his life, Kennedy is an agnostic.

Cathy Kipp

Won: Colorado State House (District 52)

Cathy Kipp won re-election to the Colorado State House in District 52, earning 66% of the vote in the general election. She serves on the House Education, Finance, and Appropriations Committees. Cathy and her husband have twin 24-year-old sons and live in southeast Fort Collins, Colorado. She served as a locally elected member of the Poudre School District School Board from 2011 to 2019, also serving for a term as Board President. Cathy’s focuses on the board included starting monthly listening sessions to make sure the community’s voice was heard and leading the board in education advocacy efforts at both the state and federal levels. She moved to Fort Collins in 1985 after graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Computer and Information Science from the University of California and spent 12 years working as a database developer prior to leaving the workforce to raise her children. Kipp does not belong to any organized religion. She says, “I respect other people’s religious choices and don’t generally discuss my beliefs or lack thereof. I believe church and state should be separate.”

Karen McCormick

Won: Colorado State House (District 11)

Karen McCormick won re-election to the Colorado House of Representatives in District 11, earning 72% of the vote in the general election. She grew up in a career Navy family with a father who served 30 years in the Navy retiring as a Rear Admiral. Through her family and experiences she “learned the meaning of service, respect, integrity and dedication to American values.” Dr. McCormick has lived these values and demonstrated her commitment to service as a veterinarian, small business owner, teacher, advocate, and mom, who “is passionate about Colorado and working for policies that will help families and our community.” In her next term in the legislature she will “continue to advocate for families, health care, education, LGBTQ rights, reproductive rights, economic opportunity for all, the future of our planet, and more.” McCormick is spiritual but not religious.

Jennifer Parenti

Won: Colorado State House (District 19)

Jennifer Parenti won election to the Colorado House of Representatives in District 19, earning 50% of the vote in the general election. Parenti is a retired military officer who took an oath to protect this country and our democracy. She says she never considered herself a political person, but with “the repeated attacks on our democracy, culminating in the shameful insurrection at our Capitol, I knew I could no longer stand on the sidelines.” Her policy priorities include: protecting the environment and natural resources, creating affordable housing, expanding public transportation, defending LGBTQ rights, increasing services for veterans, investing in public education and expanding vocational and community college opportunities, promoting responsible and sustainable development, expanding broadband access, and protecting reproductive rights. Parenti is a humanist.

Renée Reif

Ran for: El Paso (CO) County Assessor

Renée Reif ran for El Paso (Colorado) County Assessor, earning 40% of the vote in the general election. An activist, veteran, and caregiver, Reif is politically active in her community and speaks out to challenge the status quo. She has served on the City of Fountain Planning Commission, County Placement Alternative Commission, and as the democratic chair of her state house district. She is a sociologist with a Masters’ in Public Administration. As a Humanist Society Lay Leader, she works to educate the public and build bridges and served as a member of the Pikes Peak Habitat for Humanity Interfaith Unity Build Committee and the Interfaith Alliance of Colorado. Formerly the chair for the Colorado chapter of Americans United for Separation of Church and State, she still actively follows and promotes the mission and messages of Americans United . She is on the board of the Center for Freethought Equality. Reif is proud to be the Democratic candidate for this position to manage the discovering, listing and valuing of all taxable property within the county. Reif is a humanist and atheist.

Brianna Titone

Won: Colorado State House (District 27)

Brianna Titone won re-election to the Colorado State House in District 27, earning 58% of the vote in the general election. Titone’s career as a geologist brought her to Colorado. She loves the open space and wants to preserve it by helping Colorado reach 100% renewable energy. She believes that “more people are needed in government that don’t just follow their agenda, but listen to their constituents and hear their concerns.” She is also passionate about developing smart transportation solutions, funding teachers and public schools fairly, attainable housing and a living wage, a single-payer healthcare system and addressing the opioid crisis, fighting for LGBTQ+ and women’s rights, supporting veterans, better training for law enforcement officials, a worker’s right to organize, protecting reproductive rights, safeguarding net neutrality, common sense gun laws, campaign finance reform, and ending homelessness. She serves as Chair of the Legislative LGBTQ+ Caucus, Chair of the Joint Technology Committee, and as a member of the Energy & Environment, Health & Insurance and Agriculture, Livestock and Water Committees. Titone is spiritual but not religious.

David Torres

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Colorado-5)

David Torres (Santiago David Goenaga-Torres) ran for Congress in Colorado’s 5th District, earning 41% of the vote in the general election. He won the Democratic primary on June 28 with 54% of the vote. In addition to being opposed to LGBTQ and reproductive rights, the Republican incumbent in this district, Doug Lamborn, voted against certifying the 2020 presidential election and participated in a lawsuit that promoted Trump’s big lie about election fraud. Conversely, David Torres will work to “make Colorado a national example of how a society can thrive beyond the idiocy of hate.” His policy priorities include criminal justice reform, common sense gun violence prevention, behavioral health programs for veterans, high-speed broadband infrastructure, wind and solar energy production and clean energy jobs, and an immigration policy that “serves as a beacon for those who are oppressed.” Torres is an agnostic-atheist and a humanist.

Stephanie Vigil

Won: Colorado State House (District 16)

Stephanie Vigil won election to the Colorado State House in District 16, earning 50% of the vote in the general election. They ran a competitive campaign in 2020, on a platform to ensure a solid foundation in life for every Coloradan, focusing on renters’ rights, public investment in essentials like transit and education, and a just transition to renewable energy. Home to religious right institutions like Focus on the Family and New Life Church, Colorado Springs is going through a time of rapid growth and change, and experienced the biggest swing away from the former president between 2016 and 2020. With the recent redistricting, the district has become a toss-up, and Ms. Vigil is hard at work to reach enough voters for a win. Vigil is a secular humanist, an exvangelical, and an atheist.

Delaware

Paul Baumbach

Won: Delaware State House (District 23)

Paul Baumbach won re-election to the Delaware House of Representatives in District 23, earning 62% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the September 13 Democratic primary. Baumbach serves on five House committees: Economic Development, Health, Revenue/Finance (Vice-Chair), Technology, and Transportation. He has also co-chaired several task forces on public education, manufactured housing, healthcare, and municipal governments. Baumbach has a commitment to service in his community. He has led his Unitarian Universalist congregation’s social justice efforts for seven years, was President of the Progressive Democrats for Delaware, and served on the boards of Equality Delaware and the Newark Housing Authority. He currently serves on the board of the Delaware Coalition Against Gun Violence. His policy priorities include expanding access to affordable and quality healthcare, investing in public education, improving voting access, repealing the death penalty, reducing gun violence, and legalizing, regulating, and taxing the recreational use of marijuana. Baumbach is a Unitarian Universalist humanist.

Eric Morrison

Won: Delaware State House (District 27)

Eric Morrison won re-election to the Delaware House of Representatives in District 27, earning 53% of the vote in the general election. He won the Democratic primary on September 13 with 64% of the vote. Morrison is a lifelong Delawarean and a graduate of the University of Delaware with an English major, a History minor, and a concentration in Ethnic & Cultural Studies. Morrison has worked as an educator, in Medicare and Medicare, and in Human Resources. He has been active in numerous community organizations such as Delaware Pride, AIDS Delaware, and the Food Bank of Delaware. Before assuming office in 2020, Morrison was very active in helping to elect Democratic candidates and leading political issue campaigns. His policy priorities include: establishing universal public pre-K and making college and trade school education affordable, reforming the criminal justice system, instituting an annual minimum wage increase tied to the cost of living, supporting organized labor and unions, protecting the right to vote, establishing affordable and accessible healthcare, addressing the climate emergency, protecting reproductive rights, and ensuring equality for members of the LGBTQ+ community. Morrison is an atheist and a humanist.

Madinah Wilson-Anton

Won: Delaware State House (District 26)

Madinah Wilson-Anton won re-election to the Delaware House of Representatives in District 26, earning 70% of the vote in the general election. She won the Democratic primary on September 13 with 68% of the vote. Wilson-Anton is an alumna of the University of Delaware and holds a Masters of Arts in Urban Affairs and Public Policy from the Joseph R. Biden Jr. School of Public Policy and Administration. She worked for two years as a legislative fellow in the state legislature, an additional year as a legislative aide, and is now serving her first-term as a legislator. Wilson-Anton’s policy priorities include reforming the public education funding system to adequately meet student and community needs, increasing access to quality and affordable healthcare, reforming the criminal justice system, establishing paid family and medical leave for all workers, expanding the rights of tenants and creating more affordable housing, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, supporting and protecting the formation of labor unions, ending corporate welfare and increasing corporate transparency, and addressing climate change with a Green New Deal for Delaware. Wilson-Anton is Muslim and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Florida

Lori Berman

Won: Florida State Senate (District 26)

Lori Berman won re-election to the Florida State Senate in District 26, earning 55% of the vote in the general election. She was unopposed in the Democratic primary. Berman is a leader on progressive issues. She served four terms in the Florida State House and is seeking her third term in the State Senate. Her legislative priorities include advocating for reproductive rights, improving eldercare, fighting for common sense gun laws, and investing in public education. Berman is a strong believer in the separation of church and state. She serves on the following Senate Committees: Transportation, Finance and Tax, Ethics and Elections, Education, and the Appropriations Subcommittee on Agriculture, Environment, and General Government. Berman is Jewish.

Anna Eskamani

Won: Florida State House (District 42)

Anna Eskamani won re-election to the Florida State House in District 42, earning 57% of the vote in the general election. She is the daughter of working-class Iranian immigrants, an Orlando native, and a graduate of the University of Central Florida. Her vision focuses on a progressive, fair, and evidence-based public policy for Florida. She is a champion of critical issues like economic justice, environmental protection, equality for all, funding for public schools, human trafficking and sexual assault prevention, and support of arts and culture funding. Eskamani is known across the state and nation as a leader who is unbothered, unbossed, and committed to the people of Florida. She is the Ranking Democratic Member of both the Ways & Means Committee and Regulatory Reform Subcommittee. She also serves on the Joint Legislative Auditing Committee, Civil Justice & Property Rights Subcommittee, and Professions & Public Health Subcommittee. The majority of Eskamani’s family identifies with Islam, but she is secular.

Gabriel Gonzalez

Ran for: Florida State House (District 119)

Gabriel Gonzalez ran for election to the Florida House of Representatives in District 119, earning 36% of the vote in the general election. He won the Democratic primary on 8/23 with 56% of the vote. Although Gonzalez is young, he has extensive community service including founding a non-profit organization that provides support for families who have children with cancer. He also has extensive political experience. As a Miami-Dade County Youth Commissioner he advocated for issues ranging from affordable higher education to climate action with local, state, and federal officials, as well as interning with a County Commissioner’s office and a U.S. Senator. A recent Columbia University graduate with a BA in political science, Gonzalez is eager to turn his knowledge and experience into legislation “to bring the change that Florida so urgently needs!” His policy priorities include: protecting the environment and enhancing Florida’s role in combating climate change, protecting LGBTQ+ rights, improving community infrastructure, strengthening the economy, protecting reproductive and women’s rights, and investing in education and healthcare. Gonzalez is an atheist.

Sarah Henry

Ran for: Florida State House (District 38)

Sarah Henry ran for the Florida House of Representatives in District 38, earning 48% of the vote in the general election. She won the Democratic primary on 8/23 with 55% of the vote. Henry has worked in non-profits, including the American Humanist Association, throughout her career. She is driven by her commitment to social change and desire to invest in bettering the communities around her. In an elementary school assignment, Henry outlined her presidential policy positions and is now putting that continued commitment to serving the public to work. Her policy priorities include: fighting for affordable housing, defending comprehensive reproductive rights, investing in public education, and protecting the environment. Henry was raised in a nonreligious household and is nonreligious. She says, “My beliefs in equality and justice, not religion, are the principles guiding my decisions.”

Rebekah Jones

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Florida-1)

Rebekah Jones ran for Congress in Florida’s 1st District, earning 32% of the vote in the general election. She won the Democratic primary on 8/23 with 62% of the vote. In May 2020 Jones was fired for refusing to manipulate data in Florida’s plan to prematurely reopen during COVID-19. Her efforts to independently track COVID-19, both in the state of Florida and in schools nation-wide, earned her international acclaim. She was named one of Fortune’s 40 Under 40, one of Elemental’s 50 Experts to Trust, Whistleblower of the Year, Forbes’ first-ever Technology Person of the Year, and she even became a “Cosmogirl.” The Governor of Florida, in a losing battle against science, targeted Jones for her commitment to data, defamed her, and sent state police to raid her home at gunpoint without a warrant. Seeing the evil and corruption in politics, Jones is running for Congress to advocate for government transparency and accountability, promote the integrity of science and data-driven public policy, protect voting rights, address the climate crisis, and advance education opportunities “to ensure every child has access to a quality education from pre-K through graduate school.” Jones is an atheist.

Adam Morley

Ran for: Florida State House (District 19)

Adam Morley ran for the Florida State House in District 19, earning 36% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the Democratic primary. Morley likes “to keep things simple, focus on the issues that impact our daily lives, and avoid the political theater and drama that plagues today’s politics.” His policy priorities include: restoring home rule so communities can address issues in a timely manner, fighting for clean water policies, reforming campaign law, promoting renewable energy, legalizing marijuana, and keeping taxes low. He has a long standing interest in the environment. As a pre-teen he won an award for a birdhouse made from recycled materials, later he built a successful recycling business, and he and his family live in a home he built almost entirely from recycled materials and is energy self-sufficient using solar power. Morley is an agnostic.

Anthony Nieves

Ran for: Florida State House (District 47)

Anthony Nieves ran for election to the Florida House of Representatives in District 47, earning 49% of the vote in the general election. He won the Democratic primary on 8/23 with 37% of the vote. Frustrated at the tepid response of establishment politicians to the dangerous political culture of the far right, Nieves could no longer sit on the sidelines. Nieves is running to advocate for a progressive agenda that includes: free public education from pre-K to college, accessible and affordable healthcare for everyone, a Green New Deal to address climate change and environmental justice, reproductive rights and the right to bodily autonomy, accessible public transit, and employment opportunities with livable wages. Raised in a working class union strong family, Nieves has also been an active union member throughout his career in city, county and state government. His campaign is endorsed by Florida Rising, the Florida Freedom to Read Project, Florida College Democrats, Central Floridians for Public Transportation, the Democratic Progressive Caucus of Florida, and Progressive Democrats of America-Florida. Nieves is a lapsed Catholic and is an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Carlos Guillermo Smith

Ran for: Florida State House (District 37)

Carlos Guillermo Smith ran for re-election to the Florida State House in District 37, earning 48% of the vote in the general election. First elected in 2016 with 69% of the vote, he made history as Florida’s first openly LGBTQ Latino lawmaker. Smith “proudly identifies as a LGBTQ, Latino, and forward thinking millennial feminist who reflects the values and diversity of Florida.” He also made history by inviting and arranging for atheist chaplain, Tee Rogers, to give the first ever humanist invocation to the Florida legislature. Smith is a leader in opposing unconstitutional religious intrusions into government such as public school prayer and vouchers to religious schools. In addition to his advocacy for church-state separation, Smith is a champion for civil rights, cannabis reform, debt-free college, gun safety, mental health, and animal welfare. He is the Ranking Democratic Member on both the Government Operations Subcommittee and the Professions & Public Health Subcommittee. He also serves on the Pandemics & Public Emergencies Committee, Civil Justice & Property Rights Subcommittee, and Health Care Appropriations Subcommittee. Smith was raised Catholic, but now identifies as an agnostic.

David Tillery

Ran for: Florida State House (District 66)

David Tillery ran for election to the Florida House of Representatives in District 66, earning 40% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the Democratic primary. Tillery is an entrepreneur and a social and human rights activist. He founded a nonprofit that raises money for various charities including Autism Speaks. He also runs a weekly comedy show that hosts canned food drives and fundraises for Homeless Helping Homeless. He is committed to helping the most vulnerable communities in an increasingly hostile political climate. His policy priorities also include: fostering a better education system, promoting the separation of church and state, establishing affordable healthcare, protecting reproductive rights, and ensuring equal rights for all. Tillery is an agnostic.

Georgia

Brent Binion

Ran for: Georgia State Senate (District 27)

Brent Binion ran for the Georgia State Senate in District 27, earning 26% of the vote in the general election. Binion says, “The U.S. and Georgia Constitutions were written to protect and promote people of different cultures and religious backgrounds” and he is running to take a stand against the forces spreading hate and intolerance in our culture. He will be a champion in the State Senate to defend democracy, equal protection, and fair representation. “Gerrymandering in Georgia,” he says, “has already robbed voters of fair representation. We are now headed full-steam towards autocracy and theocratic rule of government dictated by narrow views, special interests and extremists.” Binion will work to establish a Georgia Voter’s Bill of Rights and an independent redistricting commission, amend the Georgia Constitution to require free and equal elections, and provide as much transparency about the government’s activity to its constituents as possible. His campaign also focuses on advocating for a woman’s right to abortion, protecting the environment, investing in public education, and providing comprehensive training to law enforcement. Binion is an atheist.

Antonio Daza

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Georgia-11)

Antonio Daza ran for Congress in Georgia’s 11th District, earning 37% of the vote in the general election. He is a lifelong advocate for freedom, justice and equality, and was unopposed in the May 24 Democratic primary. Daza was a political activist in his home country of Venezuela against the Chavez regime. In 2003, Daza joined his family in the United States and was granted political asylum until he became a U.S. citizen. Here he pursued his dream of becoming a professional ballroom dancer and in 2008, Daza opened a successful dance studio where he shares his experiences, knowledge, and dance passion with others. Daza is an LGBTQ+ immigrant running for Congress because he believes in justice, protecting and defending human rights, and ensuring that every American has equal and equitable access to opportunities. He supports protection of women’s reproductive rights, a dignifying living wage for working Americans, tax system reform to reduce income inequality, banning discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, immigration reform, expansion of voting rights, reducing the influence of money in politics, making public higher education free and canceling student debt. Daza supports Medicare For All because “access to healthcare is a right, not a privilege”, the Green New Deal “to address the social and financial consequences of the climate crisis”, and the Build Back Better Agenda “to guarantee the future every American needs and deserves”. Daza is an atheist.

Craig Meyer

Ran for: Georgia State House (District 25)

Craig Meyer ran for the Georgia House of Representatives in District 25, earning 37% of the vote in the general election. Meyer served in the U.S. Army and earned his bachelor’s degree in political science from Arizona State University. His career includes working for the FDIC and Sprint. He currently works in commercial real estate doing site acquisitions, dispositions, investment sales, and leasing. Meyer is very active in his community as a member of the Johns Creek Chamber of Commerce, Sierra Club, Atlanta Council of International Relations, Atlanta Commercial Board of Realtors, Georgia Chapter of Arizona State University Alumni, 82nd Airborne Division Association, and the Atlanta All Airborne Chapter. His policy priorities include: expanding voting rights, protecting reproductive rights, expanding Medicaid, investing in public education and increasing educator salaries, fighting climate change, and supporting the separation of church and state. Meyer is a freethinker.

Hawaii

Stanley Chang

Won: Hawaii State Senate (District 9)

Stanley Chang won re-election to the Hawaii State Senate in District 9, earning 66% of the vote in the general election. Chang is a lifelong resident of East Honolulu and the son of Chinese immigrants. After graduating from Harvard Law School, he returned home and served on the City Council of Honolulu from 2011 to 2015. As State Senator, Chang spearheaded legislation to improve Hawaii’s infrastructure, ban plastic bags, limit and curb smoking, and build shelters for the homeless. In his next term, Chang’s main focus will be on ending Hawaii’s housing shortage. He has developed legislation, based on a Singapore housing model, that would allow the state to build low-cost, high-density housing and sell it to Hawaii citizens at zero profit. His ALOHA Homes initiative would not cost taxpayers any money and would provide thousands of units to solve the affordable housing supply crisis. In addition, he is working to establish free community college, decriminalize marijuana, and improve police-community relations. Chang was not raised with a religious background and identifies as “no religion.”

Jonathan Lee

Ran for: Hawaii House of Representatives (District 44)

Jonathan Lee ran for election to the Hawaii House of Representatives in District 44 earning 24% of the vote in the August 13 Democratic primary. Lee’s career experience includes 11 years’ service in the U.S. Navy, policy analyst for Minority Veterans of America, award winning novelist and children’s book author, and as a writer, director, producer, editor of films and commercials. He volunteers with the Hawaii Nature Center, Coalition of Sailors Against Destructive Decisions, and the Autism Society of Hawaii. As the father of a child with special needs, Lee is passionate about access to early childhood development programs, a strong and inclusive public education system, and the cost of child care. His policy priorities also include: addressing the housing crisis, building a strong and sustainable economy, defending women’s rights and the LGBTQIA+ community, and legalizing recreational cannabis use. Lee is an agnostic atheist.

Matt LoPresti

Ran for: Hawaii House of Representatives (District 41)

Matt LoPresti ran for re-election to the Hawaii House of Representatives in District 41, earning 42% of the vote in the general election. He is a university teacher, with a doctorate in philosophy. He served as a member of the Hawaii State House from 2014 to 2018 and returned to this office in 2020. LoPresti serves on the Housing, Judiciary & Hawaiian Affairs, and Transportation Committees and is an Associate Professor of Philosophy and Humanities at a liberal arts college in Honolulu. His policy agenda includes increasing high-quality public education and improving school grounds and facilities, growing better and higher-paying local jobs, creating affordable housing and transitioning people out of homelessness and into permanent housing, protecting the environment and health of his constituents, and ensuring that seniors have quality healthcare and the ability to age in place. LoPresti identifies with both Catholic and Buddhist traditions and served as faculty advisor for the Secular Student Alliance group at the university where he teaches.

Illinois

Karla Bailey-Smith

Ran for: Illinois General Assembly (District 91)

Karla Bailey-Smith ran for the Illinois General Assembly in District 91 earning 37% of the vote in the June 28 Democratic primary — finishing 2nd in a field of two candidates. With a Master in Fine Arts from the University of Illinois Champaign-Urbana in Scenic Design for Theatre, she followed her love of collaborating for theatre and built a career in painting scenery for film, TV, and Broadway. However, she also has a passion for advocacy. She has been very involved in fighting for LGBTQ+ rights, gun safety, the ERA, reproductive rights, criminal justice reform, tax justice, and environmental protection. She wants to take her activism and community engagement to the state house. In addition to the above, her policy priorities include: reversing the erosion of union strength with the Workers’ Rights Amendment, investing in public education, expanding access to rural broadband, and helping farmers diversify and creatively use their farmland to increase their profits. Bailey-Smith is an active member of organizations including the League of Women Voters, the NAACP, and Moms Demand Action against Gun Violence. She is a member of a Unitarian Universalist congregation and is a humanist.

Arad Boxenbaum

Ran for: Illinois General Assembly (District 83)

Arad Boxenbaum ran for the Illinois General Assembly in District 83 earning 32% of the vote in the June 28 Democratic primary — finishing 2nd in a field of two candidates. If he had been elected Boxenbaum would have been the youngest person ever elected to the Illinois General Assembly. His extensive political experience, however, belies his youth. Boxenbaum has held leadership positions on local and federal campaigns, worked in the office of Congressman Mike Quigley, and serves as a trustee on this local library board. He is part of a new generation of leaders who are acutely aware of the immanent dangers of school gun violence and climate change. His policy priorities include: preventing gun violence, advancing LGBTQ+ equality, promoting pro-worker and pro-union initiatives, protecting reproductive rights, addressing and mitigating the damage from climate change, enacting term limits and limiting the amount of money in our politics, and ensuring that history, not whitewashed fantasy, is taught in our public schools. Boxenbaum is Jewish.

Mary Morgan

Ran for: Illinois General Assembly (District 52)

Mary Morgan ran for the Illinois General Assembly in District 52, earning 47% of the vote in the general election. She was unopposed in the June 28 Democratic primary. After a 25 year career in the wireless industry, Morgan now works in the Curriculum & Instruction Office of the Wauconda School District. Her policy priorities include: investing in public education and opposing book bans, protecting reproductive rights, increasing access to quality and affordable healthcare, advocating for LGBTQ+ equality, and creating financial accountability and an equitable state tax distribution to reduce the need for local taxes. Morgan is a lifelong Roman Catholic. She says, “Religion has always been part of my life, but public policy should be separate from all religion.”

Maria Peterson

Ran for: Illinois State Senate (District 26)

Maria Peterson ran for the Illinois State Senate House in District 26, earning 49% of the vote in the general election. She was unopposed in the June 28 Democratic primary. A former attorney at the U.S. Department of Labor litigating workplace safety violations, she also established and ran a company to help those who needed continued strength training after being released from physical therapy. Peterson has been a very active volunteer serving on her community’s utility board and planning commission, in addition to serving on the local boards of the Rotary Club, League of Women Voters, and Sierra Club. Her policy priorities include: investing in green infrastructure to address climate change, increasing trade and vocational training opportunities, making educational services for disabled students more accessible, and establishing additional crisis care services and community mental health centers. Peterson is non-religious.

Terre Layng Rosner

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Illinois-1)

Terre Layng Rosner ran for Congress in Illinois’ 1st district earning 1% of the vote in the June 28 Democratic primary — finishing 14th in a field of seventeen candidates. As an educator, researcher, negotiator, and activist, Dr. Layng Rosner will create strategic collaborations by using data driven solutions to address the critical issues facing her constituents and our country. Her policy priorities include: promoting education including trade schools and apprenticeships, alleviating student debt, promoting union labor, curtailing prescription drug costs, enacting term limits to oust and prevent career politicians, advocating for LGBTQ+ equality, addressing the endemic violence plaguing our communities, and supporting reproductive rights. Layng Rosner is an agnostic humanist.

Eric Sorensen

Won: U.S. House of Representatives (Illinois-17)

Eric Sorensen won the race for Congress in Illinois’ 17th district, earning 52% of the vote in the general election. He won the competitive June 28 Democratic primary with 38% of the vote. Sorensen worked for 22 years as a TV network weatherman earning the trust of his viewers by being a reliable, truthful source of information. He was committed to communicating climate science, connecting people with solutions, and keeping his viewers safe during severe weather. “To me,” Sorensen says, “being a meteorologist has always been about protecting our neighbors and our communities, values I learned from my family at an early age.” He has been endorsed by 314 Action, Equality PAC, the LGBTQ Victory Fund, and the National Weather Service Employees Organization. His policy priorities include: addressing climate change, providing access to quality and affordable healthcare for everyone, protecting reproductive rights, funding our public schools so teachers have the necessary resources to provide a fair, accessible, and quality education for all their students, advocating for LGBTQ+ equality, and investing in technology and biosecurity measures to prevent another pandemic. Sorensen is spiritual, but not religious.

Marsha Williams

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Illinois-17)

Marsha Williams ran for Congress in Illinois’ 17th district earning 7% of the vote in the June 28 Democratic primary — finishing 6th in a field of seven candidates. Growing up working class, Marsha understands the economic challenges that many families face. She was a single mother during the recession and worked two jobs to make ends meet. Through her lived experience, Williams wants to ensure that families of the 16th district don’t have to face the financial hardships she experienced. She is a lifelong resident of her district and, through her work as a job trainer, has dedicated her career to helping low-income and working-class individuals and families in her community. Marsha is running to fight for the issues that will improve the lives of everyday working people — which includes Medicare for All, Tuition Free Colleges and Trade Schools, transforming our systems of public safety and social justice, and a Green New Deal to create millions of green jobs and fix our broken infrastructure. Marsha identifies as a non-denominational Christian.

Indiana

Martin Del Rio

Ran for: Indiana State Senate (District 1)

Martin Del Rio ran for the Indiana State Senate in District 1 earning 34% of the vote in the May 3 Democratic primary. Del Rio is a U.S. Army combat veteran and has dedicated his life to service. Having experienced homelessness following his military service, he has built a career helping fellow veterans struggling with homelessness, opioid addiction, employment, and mental health issues. He says, “All too often the enormity of our challenges becomes overshadowed by the pettiness of our politics.” He is running to bring strong leadership to the Indiana Senate to break political inactivity on issues like: addressing climate change, reforming the criminal justice system, increasing services for veterans, improving public education, supporting unions, legalizing marijuana, investing in small business, and protecting reproductive rights. Del Rio is Catholic and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Haneefah Khaaliq

Ran for: U.S. Senate (Indiana)

Haneefah Khaaliq ran for the U.S. Senate in Indiana. She did not make the Democratic ballot for the May 3 primary. Khaaliq is the executive director and presiding officer for a civil rights agency and human relations commission, an adjunct professor at Indiana University, and provides legal and mental health services to indigent clients nationwide. She will use her civil rights and social justice experience to advocate for the protection of reproductive rights, criminal justice reform, addressing the climate crisis, enacting common sense gun violence prevention, preventing human trafficking, legalizing marijuana, and protecting voting rights.With a Muslim father and a Christian mother Khaaliq understand the need for religious freedom, acceptance, and the separation of church and state. She identifies as a Christian and is an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Iowa

Claire Celsi

Won: Iowa State Senate (District 16)

Claire Celsi won re-election to the Iowa State Senate in District 16, earning 58% of the vote in the general election. She has spent her career in the nonprofit, political, and advertising sectors and started her own business in 2009. Celsi is very active in her community. She has served on many nonprofit boards and currently serves on the Family Development and Self-Sufficiency Council, the advisory board of the Latino College Action Network, and is a founding member of the Iowa Housing Partnership. In the Senate, her policy priorities are preserving and protecting public schools from privatization, restoring reproductive healthcare, increasing the minimum wage, protecting civil rights, investing in renewable energy and green initiatives, addressing gun violence, and increasing access to affordable quality healthcare and mental healthcare services. Celsi is a non-practicing Catholic.

Elinor Levin

Won: Iowa State House (District 89)

Elinor A. Levin won the Iowa House of Representatives seat in District 89, earning 82% of the vote. Levin is a teacher, military spouse, animal lover, and community leader. She is a member of the League of Women Voters of Johnson County, Iowa City Community Theatre, and the South District Neighborhood Association. She has been endorsed by the Iowa Federation of Labor, Victory Fund, Planned Parenthood Advocates of Iowa, Run for Something, Sierra Club, and is a Gun Sense Candidate from Moms Demand Action. Levin’s policy priorities include increasing high quality childcare, enacting sensible gun safety laws, expanding access to affordable and quality healthcare, advocating for reproductive rights, accelerating the transition to renewable energy, increasing services for veterans in need, protecting and improving Iowa’s waterways, investing in public education, and supporting the arts in Iowa. Levin is culturally Jewish.

Megan Srinivas

Won: Iowa State House (District 30)

Megan Srinivas won the Iowa State House of Representatives seat in District 30, earning 64% of the vote. Srinivas is an infectious disease physician, who is very committed to the well-being of her community. She works to improve access to Hepatitis C treatment in Iowa, serves on the board of the Iowa chapter of the National Alliance for Mental Illness, and in 2020 chaired Iowa’s Biden-Harris COVID Response Council. She also serves on the Iowa Supreme Court’s Access to Justice Commission, which finds solutions that will best serve Iowans who may encounter barriers to or difficulties with fully accessing the civil justice system. She has been endorsed by 314 Action Fund, Our Revolution, and the Iowa Federation of Labor. Her policy priorities include enacting common sense gun laws, strengthening the public education system, protecting reproductive rights, expanding access to affordable and quality healthcare, and increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, Srinivas is a Hindu and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Kansas

Misti Hobbs

Ran for: Kansas State House (District 82)

Misti Hobbs ran for election to the Kansas House of Representatives in District 82, earning 34% of the vote in the general election. Hobbs, born and raised in Kansas, has distinguished herself as a trained artist, childrens book illustrator, podcaster, and will soon earn a bachelor’s degree in theology. She has been a strong advocate for children with learning disabilities and special needs. Her policy priorities include protecting reproductive rights, making mental health services accessible and affordable, and reducing or eliminating property taxes for disabled veterans. Hobbs believes in the teachings of Jesus, but is opposed to the political weaponizing of Christianity. She is a strong supporter of the separation of church and state.

Dan Osman

Won: Kansas State House (District 48)

Dan Osman won re-election to the Kansas House of Representatives in District 48, earning 51% of the vote in the general election. Public service has always been a part of his life. A graduate of the University of Kansas’s School of Law and a small business owner, Osman works with developers to ensure adequate representation of women and minority subcontractors and workers on construction projects. Osman previously served on the Hickman Mills School Board for 6 years, including as vice president of the board, and currently serves as president of his homeowners association. His key policy issues include adequate and fair funding of public education, protecting reproductive rights, restoring responsible state budgeting, and utilizing federal dollars for Medicaid expansion. Osman is Jewish and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

W. Michael Shimeall

Ran for: Kansas State House (District 78)

W. Michael Shimeall ran for election the Kansas House of Representatives in District 78, earning 46% of the vote in the general election. Dr. Shimeall is a fifth generation Kansan, family man, veteran, educator, and community leader. As an educator, he served as a teacher, principal, associate superintendent, and superintendent of public schools. He also was an associate professor of education at Emporia State University. In addition he has served his community as a city councilmember and as mayor of LaCrosse, Kansas. His policy priorities include: expanding resources for Pre-K through Post Secondary education, reforming the criminal justice system, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, protecting LGBTQ+ rights, enacting sensible gun violence prevention laws, promoting clean renewable energy plans, expanding Medicaid and increasing access to mental health services, protecting reproductive rights, and bringing transparency and accountability to government “so that Kansans can once again be proud of their legislature.” Shimeall is a Unitarian Universalist.

Maine

Pinny Beebe-Center

Won: Maine State Senate (District 12)

Pinny Beebe-Center won election to the Maine State Senate in District 12, earning 59% of the vote in the general election. Beebe-Center is a strong advocate for families and youth working on issues such as child poverty, homelessness, addiction, criminal justice reform, mental health, and the environment. She served in the Maine State House from 2015 to 2020 will now bring her experience, skills, and passion to the Senate. Her policy priorities include: supporting small businesses, expanding broadband access, protecting our environment and natural resources, increasing access to affordable and quality healthcare, bringing down the cost of prescription drugs, and ensuring that every child has access to a quality education. Beebe-Center is a member of a Unitarian Universalist congregation. She believes that “religion is a personal choice. It should not be imposed on others and clearly should not be the motivation or consideration for policy, regulation or legislation.”

Lois Galgay Reckitt

Won: Maine State House (District 122)

Lois Galgay Reckitt won re-election to the Maine State House in District 122. She was unopposed in both the primary and general election. Reckitt is a longtime activist in the women’s and LGBTQ rights movement having served as an executive vice-president of the National Organization of Women and is a co-founder of the Human Rights Campaign Fund. She established the Family Crisis Shelter in Portland Maine and served as its executive director for 30 years. She also served on the board of the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence for nearly a decade. She is the recipient of numerous awards for her advocacy on behalf of marginalized Mainers, and was inducted into the Maine Women’s Hall of Fame in 1997. Reckitt says, “Fighting for the Equal Rights Amendment and women’s rights in all arenas, reproductive freedom, racial justice, indigenous peoples’ rights, LGBTQ rights has been my life’s mission.” She is a member of the Joint Standing Committee on Criminal Justice and Public Safety and the Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary. Reckitt is agnostic.

Lynne Williams

Won: Maine State House (District 14)

Lynne Williams won re-election to the Maine State House in District 14, earning 66% of the vote in the general election. Williams is a decades-long progressive activist. She has a Ph.D. in Social Psychology and has served as a mediator for over thirty years. In addition, Williams is an attorney and has represented protesters engaging in civil disobedience, including peace and environmental activists. Williams is passionate about supporting Maine’s towns and cities. She serves on the Harbor Committee of the Town of Bar Harbor. In the Maine legislature, she advocates for climate change action, Medicare for All, public transportation in rural Maine, and civil rights and liberties. She is a member of the Joint Standing Committee on Transportation. Williams is an agnostic.

Maryland

Amy Brooks

Ran for: Maryland House of Delegates (District 13)

Amy Brooks ran for the Maryland House of Delegates in District 13. In the July 19 Democratic primary, she finished fourth of five candidates earning 18% of the vote (5 candidates for 3 seats). Brooks is a parent, educator, advocate, and community leader. She is seeking this seat because, “As a teacher, I have worked over the past 20 years to make my students, parents and colleagues feel comfortable, valued and safe by listening to their needs and finding solutions to elevate our expectations. As an elected official, I will stay committed to a respectful discourse, see how different solutions could be ‘right,’ and work for the best outcomes for all.” Her policy priorities include: fully funding public schools, addressing climate change and environmental justice, ensuring access to affordable and quality healthcare, reforming the criminal justice system, protecting reproductive rights, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, creating affordable housing, and viewing all policy decisions and legislation through a lens of racial justice and equity to correct past and current inequities. Brooks is a Unitarian Universalist.

Logan Endow

Ran for: Maryland House of Delegates (District 43A)

Logan Endow ran for the Maryland House of Delegates in District 43A. In the July 19 Democratic primary, he finished third of six candidates earning 25% of the vote (6 candidates for 2 seats). A Baltimore native, Logan graduated from Stanford University at age 19 and earned a Master’s from the London School of Economics. He has worked in epidemic control and violence prevention for the past decade. Logan works on Baltimore’s COVID response, previously led the Ebola response in Liberia’s most violent township, and has extensive experience working on youth violence prevention in Baltimore. As State Delegate for District 43A, Logan Endow will bring the courage and expertise needed to mobilize communities to overhaul Baltimore’s approach to violence and public health. His policy priorities include: investing in violence prevention interventions, investments in school based health centers & improved ventilation in schools to prevent outbreaks, and living wage/skilled trades programs. Logan is a Quaker and an ally of the humanist community.

Brooke Grossman

Won: Maryland House of Delegates (District 2B)

Brooke Grossman won election to the Maryland House of Delegates in District 2B, earning 54% of the vote in the general election. She won the July 19 Democratic primary with 61% of the vote (two candidates for one seat). As a community and nonprofit leader, she has been on the forefront of developing creative solutions to obstacles from homelessness to health equity. Her policy priorities include: creating inclusive economic development plans, increasing job training and childcare services, partnering with developers to increase affordable housing, ensuring rapid access to substance abuse and recovery programs, and fully investing in our public schools. Grossman says, “Our teachers are overworked and under supported, and our students lack the resources they need to thrive.” As a parent, she “wants our children to grow up in a community where they feel safe, where their classrooms are spaces where they can learn and grow with limited distraction, where they are part of a diverse and inclusive community, and where they can be part of effecting future change.” Grossman is spiritual but not religious.

David Moon

Won: Maryland House of Delegates (District 20)

David Moon won re-election to the Maryland House of Delegates in District 20, earning 34% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). He won the July 19 Democratic primary with 32% of the vote. He finished first with the top three candidates moving on to the general election (four candidates for three seats). Moon is a progressive legislator who is advancing legislation to tackle income inequality, protect civil liberties, address climate change, ensure access to affordable child care, make higher education affordable, improve public transit, end the failed drug war, protect reproductive rights, and enhance voter participation. His legislative successes include: banning bump stocks and tools to mimic assault weapons, repealing the crimes of sodomy and attempted suicide, shielding & expunging marijuana possession charges, ending jail penalties for minor driving offenses, and doubling compensation for harms from police misconduct. Moon is not religious and promotes secularism.

Becca Niburg

Ran for: Maryland House of Delegates (District 13)

Becca Niburg ran for the Maryland House of Delegates in District 13. In the July 19 Democratic primary, she finished fifth of five candidates earning 9% of the vote (5 candidates for 3 seats). Niburg’s legal career has focused on immigration and human trafficking first while serving with the U.S. Department of Justice and the Department of Homeland Security and now leading a non-profit in Baltimore; she also has volunteered with the DC Bar Association taking on protective order cases for victims of inter family violence as well as taking on immigration cases at the Southern border and here in Maryland. Niburg is also very active in her community. She currently serves on the Emerson Community HOA Board, the Howard County Pride as its logistics coordinator, the Howard County NAACP as an at-large board member, and the Maryland State Bar Association Immigration Section Council as legislative liaison. Her policy priorities include: making sure public education supports all of our students to its fullest capacity including those students with learning challenges, supporting smart development and increasing public transportation options, and ensuring access to quality and affordable healthcare especially including mental healthcare. Niburg is an agnostic Jew.

Julie Palakovich Carr

Won: Maryland House of Delegates (District 17)

Julie Palakovich Carr won re-election to the Maryland General Assembly in District 17, earning 28% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). As the only biologist with an advanced degree in the state legislature, Julie brings an analytical, fact-based approach to policy making. She has also served as a city council member, congressional staffer, and public policy manager for the American Institute of Biological Sciences. She currently serves on the House Ways and Means Committee and is the vice-chair of both the Montgomery County Democratic Caucus and the Legislative Review Committee for the Maryland Legislative Latino Caucus. Her policy priorities include ensuring that our elections reflect the voters’ desires with campaign finance reform and ranked choice voting, increasing affordable housing, making roads safer for pedestrians and bicyclists, closing corporate tax loopholes, providing a world-class education to every student, expanding successful anti-poverty programs, and protecting social safety nets for Marylanders. Julie Palakovich Carr was raised Catholic, but is now not religious.

Patrick Paschall

Ran for: Maryland House of Delegates (District 22)

Patrick Paschall ran for the Maryland House of Delegates in District 22. In the July 19 Democratic primary, he finished fifth of six candidates earning 8% of the vote (6 candidates for 3 seats). Paschall is a civil rights attorney and former member of the Hyattsville City Council who has devoted his life and career to amplifying the voices of those impacted by systemic injustice and inequity. He is running for office “to be a champion for the next generation to create a future that we can all believe and succeed in.” His policy priorities include: fully funding public schools, ensuring access to affordable and quality healthcare, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, creating affordable housing and childcare, ensuring full and easy access to voting, expanding our renewable energy infrastructure, and protecting reproductive rights. Paschall was raised in the United Methodist Church, but his views on religion have been evolving over the years. He tells people, “I’m probably agnostic, but I’m not entirely sure.”

Kirill Reznik

Won: Maryland House of Delegates (District 39)

Kirill Reznik won re-election to the Maryland House of Delegates in District 39, earning 32% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). He won the July 19 Democratic primary with 24% of the vote. He finished third with the top three candidates moving on to the general election (four candidates for three seats). Since joining the House in 2007, Reznik has been a champion on the treatment of autism, fairness and transparency in government contracting, patient and consumer safety, and business development and expansion. His policy priorities include: making Maryland public schools the best in the country, ensuring access to affordable and quality healthcare, investing in new and innovative transportation and transit solutions, providing existing and emerging businesses the opportunity to succeed and making sure employees are treated fairly and equitably, preserving our environment and addressing climate change, expanding access to the ballot, protecting reproductive rights, preventing gun violence, and improving and expanding civil rights and civil liberties. Reznik is Jewish and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Michigan

Joey Andrews

Won: Michigan State House (District 38)

Joey Andrews won election to the Michigan State House in District 38, earning 52% of the vote in the general election. He won the August 2 Democratic primary with 54% of the vote. Andrews’ goal in this race is to “elevate the voices of my community and bring focus to our region that has been sorely lacking for a long time.” His policy priorities include: protecting natural resources, improving infrastructure to ensure clean drinking water, modernizing public schools, repealing anti-union right-to-work laws, protecting reproductive rights, and “strengthening anti-discriminatory laws to ensure wellness, safety, and equity for all individuals, families, and communities in Michigan.” He is also “passionate about making Michigan the clean energy capital of the Midwest, creating long lasting and good paying jobs while protecting the environment and saving the community money.” Andrews was raised Catholic and is now religiously unaffiliated.

Erika Geiss

Won: Michigan State Senate (District 1)

Erika Geiss won re-election in the newly drawn Michigan State Senate seat in District 1, earning 70% of the vote in the general election. Geiss works tirelessly for the people of her district. She is actively involved in a variety of community groups dealing with education, teen health, and substance abuse prevention. In the State Senate she is the chair of the Senate Democratic Caucus, Democratic vice chair of the senate standing committees of Insurance and Banking and Transportation and Infrastructure, co-chair of the Environmental Justice Caucus, and executive vice chair of the Michigan Legislative Black Caucus. Her policy priorities include: creating more living wage jobs, improving our public schools, investing in our infrastructure and communities, increasing access to health care, addressing racism as a public health crisis, protecting the LGBTQ and immigrant communities, and improving the air and water of our communities. Geiss was raised Catholic.

Jeff Irwin

Won: Michigan State Senate (District 15)

Jeff Irwin won re-election to the Michigan State Senate in District 15, earning 71% of the vote in the general election. Irwin is a progressive activist who has served in the Senate since 2019. He has also served in the Michigan House of Representative (2011-2017) and on the Washtenaw County Board of Commissioners (1999-2010). In the Senate, he serves on the Appropriations Committee and Judiciary and Public Safety Committee. His policy priorities include: reforming the criminal justice system, improving public education, addressing climate change, protecting reproductive rights, advancing LGBTQ equality, increasing residential solar energy production, ensuring access to healthcare with Medicare for All, and protecting voting rights. Irwin is a non-believer.

Missouri

Charles West

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Missouri-6)

Charles West ran for Congress in Missouri’s 6th District. In the August 2 Democratic Party, he earned 33% of the vote finishing second of three candidates. Born and raised on a small farm in rural Northern Missouri, West is the son of factory workers who instilled the value of hard work and a determination to succeed. He is a member of the Clark County R-1 School Board and is running for Congress to bring “a fresh perspective from a person who will fight for the people and not just big business.” His policy priorities include: ensuring our public schools and teachers have the resources they need, promoting trade schools and apprenticeship programs, investing in transportation and flood control infrastructure, making affordable access to high speed internet for all, reforming trade policies to protect small family farms and prohibiting foreign ownership of farmland, and providing access to affordable healthcare to everyone. West is an atheist.

Montana

Bob Carter

Won: Montana State House (District 98)

Bob Carter won election to the Montana House of Representatives in District 98, earning 59% of the vote in the general election. Carter has had a varied career as a small business owner, computer scientist, school board member, stay-at-home dad, and as a volunteer and supporter of numerous organizations including the Missoula Area Secular Society and Freedom From Religion Foundation. Because of his experience and community involvement the current Democratic incumbent, who is now running for the State Senate, asked Carter to run for the seat. His policy priorities include: protecting human and voting rights, addressing climate change with renewable energy, nourishing small businesses, creating affordable housing, investing in public education, and promoting critical thinking, science, and the scientific method. Carter is an atheist.

Andrea Getts

Ran for: Montana State House (District 3)

Andrea Getts ran for the Montana House of Representatives in District 3, earning 42% of the vote in the general election. Growing up in Montana, Getts says she “benefited from what makes our community so special – access to public lands, public parks, public services, public schools, and the investment of resident residents of all ages who care about the community.” Using these resources Getts engaged in public service programs, developed a strong work ethic, built her leadership skills, and was instilled with a deep dedication to her community. After graduating from Brigham Young University, she worked in outdoor supply businesses in Wyoming and Utah, but was hoping to return home to contribute to the community that had generously invested in her development. That opportunity came in the form of an AmeriCorps VISTA service position with a nonprofit food access organization, and she has stayed on as a staff member to do important food security work in her community. Her policy priorities include being a responsive and transparent representative, supporting public schools and teachers, advocating for responsible gun ownership, increasing access to healthcare and mental health services, preserving public lands, alleviating housing costs, and diversifying the power grid by including renewable energy sources. Getts was raised religiously, but is no longer practicing.

Penny Ronning

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Montanta-2)

Penny Ronning ran for Congress in the Montana 2nd Congressional District, earning 20% of the vote in the general election. As a business owner, family caretaker, community organizer, city councilmember, and advocate for victims of sexual exploitation and violence, Ronning understands the issues facing Montana and the country. She also knows that “when you show up with a professional work ethic and you represent the people, wonderful things can happen.” Ronning’s policy priorities include: shifting agricultural profits from big corporations to family farmers and ranchers, expanding access to affordable and accessible healthcare, making housing affordable and attainable, protecting LGBTQIA+ rights, and defending reproductive rights. In addition, Ronning will work to protect children by supporting common-sense gun laws and the EARN IT Act, which will hold websites accountable for distributing explicit images of child exploitation and abuse. Ronning has a strong public service background in fighting for equality and public safety. Ronning is a Christian and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

John Schneeberger

Ran for: Montana State Senate (District 43)

John Schneeberger ran for election to the Montana State Senate in District 43, earning 33% of the vote in the general election. Schneeberger’s career experience includes working in small business, economic development, and non-profit organizations. He is now the director of administrative and facility services with Bitterroot College – University of Montana. His campaign is primarily concerned with protecting free and fair elections and countering Republican authoritarians, whose misinformation and dangerous rhetoric lead to the insurrection against the Republic on January 6, 2021. Schneeberger seeks to break isolating “information bubbles” by using his campaign to speak to all constituents about this existential danger to our democracy. Schneeberger is non-religious.

Nebraska

Michaela Cavanaugh

Won: Nebraska State Senate (District 6)

Machaela Cavanaugh won re-election to the Nebraska State Senate in District 6, earning 55% of the vote in the general election. Cavanaugh has 20 years’ experience in community engagement and public affairs, and a family tradition of public service. Her brother also serves in the state legislature and her father was a state legislator and a member of Congress from Nebraska’s Second Congressional District. Her public service is driven by the desire to see “a Nebraska that gives my children, and all children across the state, more opportunities to achieve their hopes and dreams.” Her policy priorities include: strengthening the public schools, providing paid family leave, preventing wasteful government spending and cutting property taxes, protecting reproductive rights, making healthcare affordable for all, addressing climate change, and investing in community services to create safer neighborhoods. Cavanaugh is Catholic and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Megan Hunt

Won: Nebraska State Senate (District 8)

Megan Hunt won re-election to the Nebraska State Senate in District 8, earning 69% of the vote in the general election. She won the May 10 top-two primary with 67% of the vote. A small business owner, community activist, mother, sixth-generation Nebraskan, and progressive legislator, Hunt has been a strong leader on criminal justice reform, reproductive rights, income inequality, climate change, church-state separation, LGBTQ+ equality, voting rights, public education, and accountability and transparency in government. Hunt believes Nebraska can be a state that “is on the right side of history, with human rights and equality of opportunity for everyone who wants to call Nebraska home. It is vital to our economic success and sustainability that we make Nebraska a more welcoming state, embracing and protecting the spectrum of voices and experiences that build the foundation of the good life we all share.” Hunt is an atheist.

Nevada

Duy Nguyen

Won: Nevada State House (District 8)

Duy Nguyen won election to the Nevada State Assembly in District 8, earning 54% of the vote in the general election. He is a Planning Commissioner for Clark County, Nevada, and the founder of two nonprofits, One APIA Nevada and the Asian Community Development Council, which work to support and advance the interests of Asian Pacific Islander Americans. Nguyen and his family immigrated to America from Vietnam when he was a child, and he knows first-hand the struggles of New Americans. He is seeking an Assembly seat to “create a more just and equitable society for all of Assembly District 8 — not just some.” His public policy priorities include: affordable healthcare, K-12 public education, climate justice, affordable housing, voting rights, language barriers, and more. Nguyen is a Buddhist.

Rochelle Nguyen

Won: Nevada State House (District 10)

Rochelle Nguyen won re-election to the Nevada Assembly in District 10, earning 57% of the vote in the general election. She is a criminal defense attorney who served three years in the Clark County Public Defender’s Office. In law school Nguyen was an editor on the law review and founded the Public Interest Law Association, a non-profit student organization that raises awareness of public interest law. She also served as a community leader with HopeLink of Southern Nevada to help move people out of poverty and into self-sufficiency. In the Nevada Assembly, she serves as Chair of the Health and Human Services Committee, Vice Chair of the Judiciary Committee, and is a member of the Education Committee. Her policy priorities include improving the public education system with more classroom resources and higher teacher pay, reforming the criminal justice system, making health care more affordable, and protecting our natural resources and addressing climate change. Nguyen is not religious.

Howard Watts

Won: Nevada State House (District 15)

Howard Watts won re-election to the Nevada State Assembly in District 15, earning 62% of the vote in the general election. A small business owner with a long record of community service, Watts “has dedicated his career to fighting for policies that preserve the environment, protect consumers, increase access to the ballot box, and ensure dignity for historically marginalized communities.” In the last legislature term, he served as Chair of the Natural Resources Committee, Vice Chair of the Growth and Infrastructure Committee, and as a member of the Ways and Means Committee. He has successfully passed laws to improve water conservation, fight climate change, expand voting access and civil rights, protect public lands, and promote racial equity. Watts has been recognized as a “Rising Environmental Leader” by the National Caucus of Environmental Legislators and by the ACLU of Nevada’s “Most Civil Libertarian Legislator.” He is looking forward to further advancing his progressive agenda in his next term. Watts is an agnostic.

New Hampshire

Paul Berch

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Cheshire 15)

Paul Berch ran for re-election to the New Hampshire House of Representatives in Cheshire 15. He lost in the Democratic primary on September 13. Berch has served in the state legislature for 10 years and currently serves on the House Judiciary Committee. He is a leader for voting rights, quality public education, environmental protection, reproductive rights, justice system reform, LGBTQ+ rights, gun safety, and health care for all. Berch is Jewish and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Justin Borden

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Belknap 4)

Justin Borden ran for the New Hampshire State House in Belknap 4, earning 34% of the vote in the general election. A progressive Democrat “who believes government exists to serve and better the lives of all its citizens, not just the wealthiest, or the special interest groups,” he supports increasing the minimum wage, common sense gun legislation, civil and voting rights for all, criminal justice reform, funding for public schools, investing in clean energy, government transparency, increasing healthcare access, and fair taxes. Borden is an atheist.

John Bordenet

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Cheshire 7)

John Bordenet ran for re-election to the New Hampshire State House in Cheshire 7. He lost the Democratic primary election on September 13. A software engineer and member of many local committees, Bordenet is running for re-election because “I care about the future of our state and think my background and skills can continue to move New Hampshire into the 21st century.” A member of the Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee, he has championed legislation reforming drug rehab treatment, protecting LGBTQ+ and civil rights, funding public education, supporting women’s rights, and strengthening environmental legislation. Bordenet’s top three issue priorities focus on providing money for state services, strengthening public education, and reforming casino operations in the state. Bordenet is a member of a Unitarian Universalist congregation.

Amanda Bouldin

Won: New Hampshire State House (Hillsborough 25)

Amanda Bouldin won re-election to the New Hampshire State House in Hillsborough District 25, earning 30% of the vote (there are 2 seats in this district). She will continue to fight to improve affordable, quality healthcare access and focus on mental health programs to mitigate and eventually put an end to the heroin crisis. Bouldin is also passionate about racial justice, LGBTQ+ rights, and voting rights. She plans to fight for marijuana legalization, sentencing and bail reform, and humane conditions for incarcerated people. In addition, she is working to repeal an archaic and unconstitutional law encouraging public school teachers to lead students in the Lord’s Prayer. Bouldin is an atheist.

Andrew Bouldin

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Hillsborough 25)

Andrew Bouldin ran for re-election to the New Hampshire State House in Hillsborough District 25; however, he withdrew from the race prior to the general election. He will focus on expanding addiction treatment options to fight the opioid epidemic, and will work for progressive union policies, voting rights, COVID-19 support for families, and criminal justice reform. To prepare students for institutions of higher learning and successful careers, Bouldin advocates for well-funded, safe, and productive public schools. In addition, he is working to repeal an archaic and unconstitutional law encouraging public school teachers to lead students in the Lord’s Prayer. Bouldin is an atheist.

Scott Burns

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Merrimack 3)

Scott Burns ran for the New Hampshire State House in Merrimack 3, earning 24% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). A former member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives from 2012 to 2014, he says, “I am committing to do everything I can to ensure that ALL of our citizens have the opportunity to live healthy, rewarding lives that provide them the opportunity to thrive and live up to their potential.” Burns believes education is key and his policy priorities include funding for education, revitalizing Franklin’s economy, stewardship programs for public land, and resources for addiction and recovery from substance abuse. Burns has a Baptist and Episcopal background but is no longer involved in organized religion.

Jacqueline Chretien

Won: New Hampshire State House (Hillsborough 41)

Jacqueline Chretien won re-election to the New Hampshire State House in Hillsborough District 41, earning 19% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). Dr. Chretien holds a PhD in molecular and cell biology and says, “I bring my analytical approach to find creative solutions to our most pressing challenges, work to keep and attract young families to New Hampshire, and ensure that the state government makes smart, long-term investments in our people and institutions.” Her policy agenda includes increasing high-quality public education; affordable housing, healthcare, and childcare; and promoting compassionate evidence-based approaches to addiction. Dr. Chretien is a humanist.

Michael DiTommaso

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Rockingham 4)

Michael DiTommaso ran for the New Hampshire State House in Rockingham 4, earning 13% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). DiTommaso grew up in New Hampshire and has seen the decline in the state’s young population. He says that the state government must take action to make New Hampshire a desirable place to start businesses and raise families. He believes in a more economically progressive system, in which the wealthy pay their fair share and working people can lead financially secure, successful lives. In the legislature, DiTommaso will fight for affordable housing, higher wages, quality education, and increased infrastructure investment. He is nonreligious and a secular humanist.

Sherry Dutzy

Won: New Hampshire State House (Hillsborough 6)

Sherry Dutzy won re-election to the New Hampshire State House in Hillsborough 6, earning 20% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). She is a board member of the Association of Secular Elected Officials and created a caucus in the New Hampshire legislature to promote the separation of church and state, evidence-based public policy, and secular governance. A firm believer that “democracy is not a spectator sport,” Dutzy works to increase civic engagement and build closer relationships between constituents and their representatives. In the legislature, she has supported increased funding for public education, measures to reduce income inequality, common-sense gun legislation, and supporting LGBTQ+ and reproductive rights. As a member of the Environment and Agriculture Committee, she works to protect New Hampshire farms and animals and supports legislation to improve solid waste management for protection of the environment. In her next term, Dutzy will continue her advocacy for transparent and functional government that fully answers to its constituents. Dutzy identifies as a nonbeliever, atheist, and humanist.

Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Grafton 18)

Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban ran for the New Hampshire State House in Grafton 18, earning 50% of the vote in the general election (only a 4 vote difference!). An acclaimed anthropologist and specialist in human rights, ethics, and race issues, Fluehr-Lobban is intimately acquainted with many of the issues facing America and New Hampshire today. Fluehr-Lobban will use her training as an academic and scientist to find evidence-based, workable solutions to New Hampshire’s most pressing issues. Her work as a beekeeper has also taught her about the complexity and fragility of New Hampshire’s ecosystem and agriculture, and how partisan policies can damage the environment and economy beyond repair. Fluehr-Lobban will fight for environmental policies that improve the lifestyle of New Hampshirites while protecting the state’s most valuable industries. Fluehr-Lobban was raised Catholic, but now has no religious affiliation.

Holly Hillhouse

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Hillsborough 16)

Holly Hillhouse ran for the New Hampshire House of Representatives in Hillsborough 16, earning 23% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). Hillhouse is a social worker with a focus on mental health and social services. Her political focus is directed towards finding ways to relieve oppression and economic disparities that prevent people from thriving. Her policy priorities include: protecting voting rights, increasing access to mental health care and substance abuse programs, alleviating the current economic and housing crises, increasing access to affordable childcare, and investing in public education. She says running for office is “so much more than the issues that we identify as important – it’s also about deciding together, as a community, how we want to instill integrity, authenticity, creativity, and innovation into our political process.” Hillhouse is spiritual but not religious.

Timothy Horrigan

Won: New Hampshire State House (Strafford 10)

Timothy Horrigan won re-election to the New Hampshire State House in Strafford 10, earning 20% of the vote in the general election (there are 4 seats in this district). In his tenure in the House, he passed key legislation preserving free admission to state parks for seniors, securing funding and resources for the University of New Hampshire, and allowing vacant legislative seats to be filled more quickly. When re-elected, Horrigan will continue to work for free and fair elections, judicial reform, environmental protection, a sustainable economy, and fully funded public schools. Horrigan is Christian and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Don House

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Belknap 8)

Don House ran for the New Hampshire State House in Belknap 8, earning 22% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). After a distinguished 40-year career in technology, House now happily volunteers for several charitable causes, and works as a snowsports instructor at a local ski resort and a mission pilot for the Civil Air Patrol. His wide-ranging community involvement has made him a well-respected local leader. Once elected, House will use his technology and business experience to find data-driven, proven solutions to New Hampshire’s problems. He will promote transparency in the state legislature, and support marijuana decriminalization, paid family leave, public education, climate change action, reproductive rights, and many other evidence-based policy solutions. House is a member of the American Humanist Association and is a spiritual humanist.

Richard Lobban

Ran for: New Hampshire State Senate (District 7)

Richard Lobban ran for the New Hampshire State Senate in District 7, earning 46% of the vote in the general election. Lobban is an archaeologist and Egyptologist by trade and is regarded as an expert on foreign policy and human rights. His activism for human rights is central to his political career, and he will bring a particular passion for civil rights and liberties to the New Hampshire State House. In addition to academia, Lobban is an enthusiastic beekeeper alongside his wife, Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban. Beekeeping not only protects bees from large-scale extinction in New Hampshire and elsewhere, but also fosters a healthier, more prosperous ecosystem. Lobban will continue to fight for New Hampshire’s incredible natural environment, science-backed state policies, and the rights of all New Hampshirites. Lobban has no religious affiliation and is a freethinker.

Kat McGhee

Won: New Hampshire State House (Hillsborough 35)

Kat McGhee won re-election to the New Hampshire State House in Hillsborough 35, earning 26% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). McGhee worked in technology as a Project Management Professional for over 20 years and has volunteered on several local boards and chaired several organizations. Serving on the Science, Technology & Energy Committee, she fights for environmentally sound energy policies and smart community-based solutions. Kat is a strong proponent of government accountability and evidence-based decision-making. In her next term, her priorities include helping to strengthen New Hampshire’s post-pandemic economy, adequately funding public education, fighting the influence of money in politics, and making sure New Hampshire works for all Granite Staters. McGhee does not practice any religion.

Ellen Read

Won: New Hampshire State House (Rockingham 10)

Ellen Read won re-election to the New Hampshire House of Representatives in Rockingham 10, earning 22% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). Read is passionate about what it means to have good-faith representation in politics, and has served on numerous local nonpartisan organizations working for fair and transparent elections. Her campaign slogan, “People, Planet, Principles,” encapsulates her policy priorities of: empowering constituents by providing high quality education, comprehensive healthcare, affordable housing, and livable wages; protecting the planet by preserving natural resources and addressing climate change with renewable energy, efficiency standards, and reduced emissions; and advancing principles of civic engagement, civil discourse, inclusion, cooperation, and fairness and transparency in government and elections. Read is an agnostic.

Melanie Renfrew-Herbert

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Hillsborough 29)

Melanie Renfrew-Hebert ran for New Hampshire House of Representatives in Hillsborough 29, earning 12% of the vote in the general election (there are 4 seats in this district). Renfrew-Hebert’s professional and educational experience involves working in policy and economic development, and she also serves as the Chair of the Trustees of the Trust Funds and Budget Committee for the Town of Goffstown. She says that “holding public office is a responsibility, not a right” and “honesty, integrity, modesty, and the ability to listen critically when others speak” is crucial to representing constituents. Her policy priorities include: investing in quality education, protecting reproductive rights, safeguarding the environment, lowering property taxes and health care costs, addressing the opioid crisis, and advocating for affordable and accessible housing. Renfrew-Hebert is an agnostic.

Carry Spier

Won: New Hampshire State House (Hillsborough 6)

Carry Spier won election to the New Hampshire House of Representatives in Hillsborough 6, earning 19% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). Spier is a first-time candidate. She could no longer “sit on the sidelines while bills are being passed into law that limit our rights and seek to marginalize people.” With an extensive educational and professional background in electrical engineering and computer science, the recently retired engineer will provide a thoughtful voice in the New Hampshire legislature advancing well-researched and evidence-based public policy. Her policy priorities include: advocating for reproductive rights, protecting the environment, investing in public education, promoting diversity and inclusion, expanding mental health services, and supporting measures to reduce gun violence. Spier is culturally Jewish.

Wendy E.N. Thomas

Ran for: New Hampshire State House (Hillsborough 12)

Wendy E.N. Thomas ran for the New Hampshire State House in Hillsborough 12, earning 6% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). She previously served in the New Hampshire House of Representative from 2018 to 2020. A mother of six, Wendy Thomas is a journalist who writes about parenting, backyard poultry, and adventures in being thrifty. Her legislative agenda includes protecting drinking water from corporate contamination, legalizing cannabis, protecting church-state separation, and opposing school vouchers. Thomas is spiritual but not religious.

New Mexico

Sharonlee Cummins

Ran for: New Mexico State House (District 51)

Sharonlee Cummins ran for the New Mexico House of Representatives in District 51, earning 37% of the vote in the general election. Cummins is a veteran and member of the Marine Corps League, Marine Corps Association, Women Marine Association, and the American Legion. She is a retired electrical engineer who worked for Lockheed Missile and Space Corporations, General Dynamics, Rockwell International, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. She has also been very involved in community emergency preparedness programs and search and rescue teams. She has previous government experience as a city council member. For this campaign, she is also endorsed by Planned Parenthood. Her policy priorities include: protecting reproductive rights, addressing climate change, reforming the criminal justice system, increasing mental health services, protecting the separation of church and state, and promoting equality for the LGBTQ+ community. Cummins is spiritual but not religious.

Darshan Patel

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (New Mexico-2)

Darshan Patel ran for Congress in New Mexico’s 2nd District earning 22% of the vote in the June 7 Democratic primary. He decided to run for Congress because he saw his unvaccinated patients die of COVID in response to “the spread of misinformation and partisan extremism in our communities that impacts our most vulnerable neighbors.” He felt it was his obligation to help correct the course in his district and society. His life’s work has been rooted in public service. Patel is a rural doctor, national union leader, and former public school math teacher. As a physician, he will work in Congress to reduce healthcare costs, expand access, and fill the gaps of our system that is full of inequity. As a union president, he will work in Congress to protect workers’ rights and fight for jobs that pay a living wage to expand the middle class. As a former public school teacher, he will advocate in Congress for fully-funded public schools and fight to make sure our children have the resources to get ahead in a 21st century economy. Dr. Patel identifies as a queer cis-man of color and an agnostic.

New York

Harvey Epstein

Won: New York State Assembly (District 74)

Harvey Epstein won re-election to the New York State Assembly in District 74, earning 79% of the vote in the general election. A public interest attorney Epstein “has been at the forefront of critical economic development and housing issues; at the same time, he has worked tirelessly on dozens of pieces of legislation that have helped improve the lives of everyday New Yorkers.” He has dedicated over 20 years of service to his communities by protecting low-wage workers and the rights of LGBTQIA individuals. Since assuming office in 2018, Epstein has championed legislation to improve social welfare including environmental sustainability, investments in primary and higher education, and to improve accessibility and employment for people with disabilities. In addition, Epstein has fought for criminal justice reform and to expand and preserve affordable housing. Epstein is Jewish and agnostic.

Matthew Mackey

Ran for: New York State Assembly (District 101)

Matthew Mackey ran for election to the New York State Assembly in District 101, earning 36% of the vote in the general election. Mackey is a social worker, dragtivist, and nonbinary. Xe began activism early in life. Raised by deaf parents, xe advocated for sign language interpreters at xis school functions. Since then xe has been active in LGBTQ+ equality, animal protection, food insecurity, and families who have children with special needs. Mackey’s passion for helping disenfranchised communities lie in xis dream of seeing a socially just world. Mackey “hopes for a world where everyone has an equal playing field and where everyone can exist without fear of rejection for being who they are.” Xis policy priorities include: protecting reproductive rights, addressing climate change, closing the wealth gap, establishing affordable and temporary public housing, investing in evidence-based treatment centers and drug prevention programs, creating a single-payer and not-for-profit health insurance system, increasing broadband access, and expanding funding of public education and making sure no child goes hungry. Mackey is a humanist and agnostic.

North Carolina

Wendy Ella May

Ran for: North Carolina State House (District 28)

Wendy Ella May ran for election to the North Carolina House of Representatives in District 28, earning 28% of the vote in the general election. She was the first open LGBTQIA2 candidate to run for elected office in Johnston County in a 2016 campaign for the Board of Commissioners. May says the issues facing her community are daunting, and her mission is to be a voice of reason, a champion of equality, and a trailblazer for the next generation. Her policy priorities include: providing more assistance to Veterans, protecting women’s rights, advancing equality for underrepresented groups, strengthening public education, fostering economic development, expanding access to affordable healthcare and stopping the degradation of our environment. She is disabled US Army veteran and a small business owner. May is a Christian and an ally to the atheist and humanist community.

Julie Mayfield

Won: North Carolina State Senate (District 49)

Julie Mayfield won re-election to the North Carolina State Senate in District 49, earning 66% of the vote in the general election. She won the competitive May 17 Democratic primary with 68% of the vote. Mayfield is a practical progressive who is working to “accomplish real change that improves lives and makes our community stronger.” In her first term she championed successful legislation that advances the use of clean energy, helps local governments stop construction that pollutes waterways, and funds local schools to purchase femine hygiene products for their students. She is also a leader in defending human rights. Following a floor statement in solidarity with the LGBTQ community, the homophobic Lt. Gov. Mark Robinson, who presides over the State Senate, confronted Mayfield shaking his finger in her face and yelling he did not appreciate her comments. Mayfield says, “I will not be bullied — by the Lt. Governor or anyone else — especially when it comes to human rights and showing basic decency and respect for others. There are no lesser people and, if the Lt. Governor thinks there are, then maybe he’s in the wrong job.” Mayfield is an agnostic.

Steve Miller

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (North Carolina-7)

Steve Miller ran for Congress in North Carolina’s 7th Congressional District earning 23% of the vote in the May 17 Democratic primary — finishing 3rd in a field of four candidates. Miller earned a doctorate in physical chemistry and started his career with the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), where he advanced emission standards for the Clean Air Act. He established his own consulting company to advise government agencies and private companies in environmental technology. Later, he co-founded companies in the biometric and radio frequency identification industries. Since retiring to Wilmington, NC, Miller has become very involved with community groups to provide assistance to people with disabilities, food insecurity, and educational performance issues. His policy priorities include addressing the climate crisis, protecting reproductive rights, reforming the criminal justice system, providing a public option for healthcare, decriminalizing marijuana, and overhauling our infrastructure. He says, policies are important, but “the driving force in my campaign is the role the incumbent continues to play in denying the results of the Presidential election, which led directly to the seditious insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Our democracy is fragile and to preserve it we must remove this incumbent and other like-minded elected officials.” Miller is a secular humanist.

Ron Osborne

Ran for: North Carolina State House (District 64)

Ron Osborne ran for the North Carolina House of Representatives in District 64, earning 37% of the vote in the general election. Recently retired as an emergency preparedness manager for Duke Energy, Osborne is seeking office because his community “deserves trustworthy, responsible, and homegrown leadership.” Osborne spent his childhood in the rural parts of North Carolina and later raised three children with his wife on their homestead farm. His policy priorities include: establishing reliable and high-speed broadband for rural areas, investing in public education and sustainable energy, expanding Medicaid, enacting common-sense gun laws, and making sure public servants like firefighters, teachers, healthcare workers, and police officers are paid fair wages. Osborne is a Quaker and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Ohio

Chuck Horn

Ran for: Ohio House of Representatives (District 45)

Chuck Horn ran for the Ohio House of Representatives in District 45, earning 36% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the Democratic primary on May 3. Horn’s father was a mayor and state senator. Chuck did not follow in his father’s political footsteps until the escalation of gun violence, rejection of acceptable political norms, and rampant corruption made it impossible for him to continue on the electoral sidelines. His policy priorities include: advocating for a living wage and the dignity of all work, preventing the emerging gig economy from exploiting labor with independent contractor classifications, investing in green infrastructure and renewable energy industries, ensuring access to affordable and quality healthcare, enacting common sense gun safety regulations, rooting out political corruption with additional transparency and disclosure laws, and ensuring that we have a well-educated populace by strongly supporting public education. Horn was raised a Unitarian Universalist and is now religiously unaffiliated.

Oregon

Jonathan Chenjeri

Ran for: Oregon House of Representatives (District 56)

Jonathan Chenjeri ran for the Oregon House of Representatives in District 56, earning 27% of the vote in the general election. Chenjeri is a teacher, union member, organizer, and proud resident of Klamath Falls, Oregon. His campaign “is about reclaiming rural Oregon and rural America, and together defining a New Deal for our region.” His New Deal includes protecting natural resources and addressing climate change; seeking to end homelessness, poverty, and closing the wealth gap; strengthening labor unions and increasing the minimum wage; providing greater support for public education from pre-k through university; investing in infrastructure and expanding broadband access; and, advocating for equity across race, gender, ability, and class. Chenjeri says, “This is a campaign that seeks to rethink and reimagine what economic development in our area means; that encourages real conversations about our strengths, needs and our future.” Chenjeri works with church volunteer groups and homeless shelters, though he is not a believer.

Julie Fahey

Won: Oregon House of Representatives (District 14)

Julie Fahey won re-election to the Oregon House of Representatives in District 14, earning 60% of the vote in the general election. Fahey has worked as a business consultant and co-founder of a human resources consulting firm for 20 years where she helps employers pay their employees fairly, build a skilled workforce, and create healthy working environments. In the Oregon House, she currently serves as the House Majority Leader, the Chair of the Housing Committee, and the Vice Chair of the Rules Committee. Her key policy issues include increasing the supply of affordable housing, enhancing career and technical education in public schools, making health care a human right and accessible to all, addressing the challenge of climate change, increasing state investment in higher education, and improving access to mental health care and substance abuse programs. Fahey does not identify with any religion.

Zach Hudson

Won: Oregon House of Representatives (District 49)

Zach Hudson won re-election to the Oregon State House in District 49, earning 52% of the vote in the general election. Hudson is a teacher and former Troutdale City Council member. He says he “became a teacher because I believe everyone deserves the opportunity to succeed and thrive.” As an elected official, he views the state’s challenges and opportunities through the eyes of a teacher. Hudson says, “I am passionate about investing in our kids and protecting our future. I will work for all Oregonians to promote equity and community, and to make the system fairer and more effective.” He is an Assistant Majority Leader in the House Democratic Leadership Team, and serves on the House Education Committee, House Environment and Natural Resources Committee, House Economic Recovery and Prosperity Committee, and the Ways and Means Subcommittee for General Government. Hudson is an atheist.

Pam Marsh

Won: Oregon House of Representatives (District 5)

Pam Marsh won re-election to the Oregon House of Representatives in District 5, earning 64% of the vote in the general election. Marsh served as an Ashland City Council member and as manager of the Ashland Emergency Food Bank. She earned a BA in Political Science from Southern Oregon University. Marsh is committed to strengthening public education and health care delivery systems, increasing affordable housing and the minimum wage, and addressing climate change by fostering an energy economy based on renewable resources and emerging technologies. In the Oregon legislature, she is an Assistant House Majority Leader and a member of the House Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (Chair), House Special Committee on Wildfire Recovery (Vice-Chair), House Committee on Revenue, and House Committee on Agriculture, Land Use, and Water. Marsh is not affiliated with a religious organization and believes that “one’s religious views are irrelevant to public office.”

Courtney Neron

Won: Oregon House of Representatives (District 26)

Courtney Neron won re-election to the Oregon State House in District 26, earning 53% of the vote in the general election. As a teacher, mother, and legislator, Neron is focused on the future. She knows firsthand the importance of a strong public education, affordable housing, accessible healthcare, and environmental stewardship. She is working to create a safer, healthier Oregon full of opportunity for the next generation. Her priority is listening to the people of her district and standing up for them in the state capital to ensure they have the investments, policies, protections, and opportunities needed to thrive. Neron serves as Vice-Chair of the House Education Committee and serves on the Joint Natural Resources Budget Committee, House Veterans and Emergency Preparedness Committee, House Early Childhood Committee, and House Housing Committee. Neron is a Unitarian Universalist.

Jesse S. Smith

Ran for: Oregon House of Representatives (District 18)

Jesse S. Smith ran for election to the Oregon House of Representatives in District 18, earning 30% of the vote in the general election. Smith is an author, musician, web developer, and world traveler. He has had a very varied career. He started work in a fast-food chain, spent a season at a fish cannery in Alaska, taught music at a private school in Cairo, held various positions at a science museum in Portland, taught himself programming languages from textbooks while riding the bus to his day job, and during the pandemic lockdown he was a stay-at-home dad making sure his children didn’t fall behind in their education. These experiences have provided Smith with a great deal of knowledge about the struggles facing individuals and families in his community and the empathy to advocate for policies that will help his community. His policy priorities include: fully funding the public schools, ensuring fair pay for all Oregon’s workers, establishing a truly universal health care system, and combating global climate change. Smith is a spiritual humanist.

Pennsylvania

David Brown

Ran for: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 166)

David Brown ran for the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 166 earning 42% of the vote in the May 17 Democratic primary — finishing 2nd in a field of two candidates. Brown is an organizer, educator, and musician who is seeking to bring his progressive vision to the statehouse to “fight for the future we deserve.” As chair of the Secular Democrats of Pennsylvania and a member of the PA State Democratic Committee, he is also working to get more progressive candidates to run for, and win, elected office. His policy priorities include: protecting voting rights and rooting out voter suppression efforts, fighting the climate crisis and prohibiting new fracking, supporting a $15 minimum wage that is indexed to the cost of living, reforming the criminal justice system to address racial disparities, expanding healthcare coverage and protecting reproductive rights, and supporting the full and equitable funding of all of our public schools. Brown is a Unitarian Universalist atheist.

Hope Christman

Ran for: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 176)

Hope Christman ran for the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 176, earning 37% of the vote in the general election. She was unopposed in the May 17 Democratic primary. As a community organizer and social worker, Christman embodies her profession’s ethical principles “to serve those in need and address social problems, challenge social injustices, be respectful and mindful of cultural and ethnic differences, recognize the value of and strength in human relationships, be trustworthy, and continually develop professional knowledge to practice in a competent manner.” She wants to bring her skills and principles to the statehouse to ensure her constituent’s voices are heard and to work to make their lives better. Her policy priorities include: common-sense property tax reform, affordable and equitable quality public education for children and advanced learning and trade education for adults, an increase in mental health services, and help for small business owners who have been overlooked by the current state legislature. Christman was raised as a Jehovah Witness, explored multiple religious traditions, and is now spiritual.

Nerissa Galt

Ran for: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 6)

Nerissa Galt ran for the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 6, earning 29% of the vote in the general election. She was unopposed in the May 17 Democratic primary. Galt is a quality control engineer who seeks out continuous improvement for her work and as a mom she works to make sure everyone is heard and cared for. She wants to take these skills to the state legislature to help Pennsylvania’s communities improve and grow, and to allow all residents to flourish and prosper. Her policy priorities include: raising the minimum wage to a living wage, providing property tax relief by increasing state funding of education, making public school funding equitable across districts, protecting reproductive rights, making healthcare accessible and affordable, addressing climate change, and fostering economic health and prosperity for all. Galt is an atheist.

Emily Kinkead

Won: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 20)

Emily Kinkead won re-election to the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 20, earning 61% of the vote in the general election. She won the competitive May 17 Democratic primary with 66% of the vote. In her first term of office, Emily has advocated for the values that she believes “need to be more central in our government policy – justice, equity, and diversity.” Prior to holding this office she worked for Common Cause on government ethics reform, the National Institutes of Health in their legislative policy office, and provided legal aid to vulnerable individuals facing eviction. Emily listens to the needs of her constituents, takes their concerns to the statehouse, and is determined to effectuate the long-overdue changes to address these issues. Her policy priorities include: increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, expanding access to quality healthcare for all, reforming public school funding to ensure equity across districts, ensuring that economic development is sustainable and equitable, protecting reproductive rights, reforming the criminal justice system, and addressing the climate crisis. Kinkead was raised Methodist and is now culturally Christian.

Brian Munroe

Won: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 144)

Brian Munroe won election to the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 144, earning 51% of the vote in the general election. Munroe has a history of putting people and community ahead of politics and will continue to do so as a member of the state legislature. He is a U.S. Navy veteran who has served as a police officer and a volunteer fireman and emergency medical technician. He was elected to the Warminster Township Board of Supervisors and currently serves as the Clerk of the Courts. His policy priorities include: raising the minimum wage to a living wage, investing in clean energy and green jobs, enacting common sense gun violence prevention legislation, advancing LGBTQ+ equality, protecting reproductive rights, ensuring access to affordable and quality healthcare, expanding addiction treatment programs, and ending gerrymandering. Munroe is a Christian and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Chelsea Oliver

Ran for: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 4)

Chelsea Oliver ran for the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 4, earning 38% of the vote in the general election. She was unopposed in the May 17 Democratic primary. Oliver is a former Corry City Councilmember and an experienced community champion who will be able to work with both sides of the aisle to address the issues of rural communities and small towns. She is “committed to making the day-to-day life of our residents not only easier, but meaningful.” Her policy priorities include: expanding broadband access and providing digital literacy training, investing in public education to prepare and empower our children for the future, preparing our workforce for our growing and transforming local industries, ensuring access to quality and affordable physical and mental healthcare for all, aligning infrastructure investments with our changing industries and economies, advancing agritourism, and preserving our green spaces. Oliver was raised in a very strict Christian household, and is now spiritual but not religious.

Mark Pinsley

Ran for: Pennsylvania State Senate (District 16)

Mark Pinsley ran for the Pennsylvania State Senate in District 16, earning 45% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the May 17 Democratic primary. Pinsley is a Pennsylvania-born small-business owner, veteran, father, husband, and public servant. He served as a Commissioner for South Whitehall Township and is the current Controller for Lehigh County. His efforts in this office have saved the county, and taxpayers, millions of dollars in eliminating unnecessary costs and instituting better financial practices. As a member of the state senate, Pinsley is committed to defending civil rights, repairing our criminal justice system, creating an economy that works for everyone, investing in better public education, protecting our environment, increasing health and human services, countering corruption with greater transparency in government, and making voting easy and secure. Pinsley is Jewish and a humanist.

Chris Rabb

Won: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 200)

Chris Rabb won re-election to the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 200, earning 96% of the vote in the general election. He won the competitive May 17 Democratic primary with 62% of the vote. RepRabb is a father, teacher, author, social justice activist, and a state representative. He is one of the most prolific legislators in the statehouse, having authored over 50 bills and resolutions in the last legislative session alone. He has expanded loans for microenterprises, increased funding for pediatric cancer research, and established scholarships and grants for youth in communities with high incarceration rates. RepRabb is a founding member of the Pennsylvania Climate Caucus and the founding chair of the House Democratic Equity Committee, which researches, reports on and recommends ways to broadly improve social equity within the House Democratic caucus. His policy priorities include: voting rights protection and expansion including same-day registration and early voting, transforming the criminal legal system, increasing transparency and accountability in government, protecting reproductive rights, empowering working people and labor unions, and creating affordable housing. RepRabb is not religious.

Chris Rodkey

Ran for: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 93)

Chris Rodkey ran for the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 93, earning 34% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the May 17 Democratic primary. Rodkey is a husband, father, educator, author, small business owner, and a United Church of Christ pastor. He wants to use his unique and valuable professional background to be an elected official “that actually represents the needs of working-class people, honestly communicates, and listens to divergent opinions.” His policy priorities include: providing tax breaks for the self-employed and “gig” workers; reforming public school funding to ensure equity across districts; protecting our natural resources with a holistic approach to stewardship and sustainability; addressing the opioid crisis by focusing on addiction and recovery measures; reforming the criminal justice system; legalizing cannabis in a way to ensure that small and family-owned farms benefit; and creating a non-partisan redistricting process removed from the state legislature. Rodkey is a Christian.

Meghan Rosenfeld

Ran for: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 139)

Meghan Rosenfeld ran for the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 139, earning 37% of the vote in the general election. She won the competitive May 17 Democratic primary with 54% of the vote. Rosenfeld is a paralegal and pre-law undergraduate student, an advocate for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence, and a dance teacher. She is seeking this seat because “rural communities have been neglected far too long by state lawmakers.” Her policy priorities include: establishing and protecting rural hospitals and ambulance services, maintaining high quality public education free from bigoted and divisive socio-political interference, expanding broadband service so everyone has high-speed internet access, creating affordable daycare and state-funded before and after school care options, addressing the opioid crisis by focusing on addiction and recovery measures, providing grants for solar panels on homes and the construction of wind farms, and investing in physical infrastructure to maintain roads and replace aged and dangerous bridges and to enhance power grids and water systems. Rosenfeld was raised a Unitarian Universalist and is a humanist.

Mark Rozzi

Won: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 126)

Mark Rozzi won re-election to the Pennsylvania General Assembly in the 126th District, earning 63% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the May 17 Democratic primary. Rozzi’s Italian immigrant parents worked long hard hours to provide for their family and aspired their children to reach for the American Dream. Rozzi runs a small business that has been in his family since 1969. He took over the business after his father succumbed from a glioblastoma brain tumor. His father’s fight inspired Rozzi to introduce legislation allowing end-of-life care to include medical aid in dying. Rozzi’s inspiration to run for office was when a childhood friend put a gun to his chest and committed suicide. His friend was sexually abused by the same priest that sexually abused Rozzi in the 8th grade. Rozzi has been a leader in the fight for the victims of sexual abuse in PA and across the world. In response to his advocacy, the Catholic Conference and Insurance lobbyists spent millions trying to defeat him and his efforts. His other policy priorities include: protecting women’s reproductive rights, generating small business growth, investing in infrastructure improvement and expansion, advocating for term limits and reducing the size of the legislature, improving and investing more funds into pre-k, k-12 and higher education, increasing the minimum wage, safer communities and youth homelessness. Rozzi is a freethinker.

Brian Sims

Ran for: Pennsylvania Lt. Governor

Brian Sims ran for Lt. Governor of Pennsylvania earning 23% of the vote in the May 17 Democratic primary — finishing 2nd in a field of three candidates. He is a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives serving Philadelphia. Sims won the office in 2012 unseating a 28-year incumbent and became the first openly gay member of the Pennsylvania legislature. Prior to elected office he was a distinguished policy attorney and civil rights advocate working on issues ranging from gender and pay inequity to environmental protection. As the next Lt. Governor, he is committed to “strengthening and protecting public education, preserving services for seniors and other vulnerable Pennsylvanians, making affordable health care more available, expanding civil rights for all Pennsylvanians, preserving our environment while investing in alternative energy, creating jobs and cleaning up Harrisburg.” Sims is not religious.

Robert Zeigler

Ran for: Pennsylvania General Assembly (District 171)

Robert Zeigler ran for the Pennsylvania General Assembly in District 171, earning 31% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the May 17 Democratic primary. Zeigler got involved in politics because a variety of issues were not being addressed in his community. Rather than complain about problems, he highlighted solutions. As a member and president of the Millheim Borough Council, Zeigler has enabled municipal owned properties to use solar powered electricity, passed anti-corruption measures, adopted an LGBTQ+ equality resolution, expanded broadband access, and started to reinvigorate the small business community to generate new jobs. He wants to take this experience, and his value of “not just governing for the people – but with the people,” to the statehouse. His other policy priorities include: reforming the criminal justice system, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage and providing paid family leave, protecting the right to vote, increasing transparency in government, eliminating dark-money that corrupts our elections, and addressing the climate crisis. Zeigler is an agnostic atheist.

South Carolina

Keith Grey, Sr.

Ran for: South Carolina House of Representatives (District 45)

Keith Grey Sr. ran for the South Carolina State House in District 45, earning 33% of the vote in the general election. His career has ranged from sheet metal fabricator and union organizer to small business owner and database administrator. Grey is very active in his community focussing on civil rights, housing, politics, and the arts. His policy priorities include: expanding Medicaid with the goal of universal healthcare, legalizing medical cannabis and decriminalizing recreational use, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, enacting common sense gun violence prevention measures, investing in renewable energy to address climate change, increasing public school teachers’ pay and resources, expanding access to broadband, protecting reproductive rights, reforming the criminal justice system and rooting out systemic racism, and properly funding regulatory oversight of corporations and making penalties proportional to the size of the company violating the rules. Grey is a Unitarian Universalist.

Ryan Thompson

Ran for: South Carolina House of Representatives (District 106)

Ryan Thompson ran for the South Carolina State House in District 106, earning 26% of the vote in the general election. Thompson is a recent political science graduate of the College of Charleston Honors College, where he served in numerous leadership positions including Student Body President. He has also interned for Congressman Joe Cunningham, served as a student representative on the Council for Higher Education, and worked on numerous political campaigns across South Carolina. Thompson’s policy priorities include: ensuring students have the best teachers in public schools by increasing teacher salaries and reducing class sizes, expanding Medicaid, protecting reproductive rights, legalizing medicinal marijuana, improving infrastructure and expanding broadband access, and preserving and protecting the environment that is vital to our health and wellbeing and to the economy of South Carolina. Thompson is a Unitarian Universalist and an agnostic.

Matt Vilardebo

Ran for: South Carolina House of Representatives (District 26)

Matt Vilardebo ran for the South Carolina House of Representatives in District 26, earning 37% of the vote in the general election. Vilardebo is an engineer. He says, “I spent my career as an expert in fixing things and now I want to take that expertise to Columbia and fix our broken government!” He called out the Republican incumbent, and her colleagues, as regressive rather than conservative because they are moving our country backwards. His policy priorities include restoring reproductive rights, protecting voting rights, improving public education by increasing teacher pay and resources, investing in infrastructure improvements, defending the LGBTQ community, addressing climate change, and enacting common sense gun laws. Having Parkinson’s disease, Vilardebo supports increasing access to quality healthcare and supports medical cannabis and the decriminalization of recreational cannabis use. Vilardebo is a humanist.

South Dakota

Dan Andersson

Ran for: South Dakota State Senate (District 21)

Dan Andersson ran for the South Dakota State Senate in District 21, earning 18% of the vote in the general election. Andersson was born in Sweden and has lived and worked in many places around the world. He met the woman who would become his wife while working in London, and they moved to her hometown in South Dakota to raise their family. Andersson is a “firm believer that it is possible to achieve a society where everyone has a fair chance to succeed.” His policy priorities include: high-quality, affordable, universal healthcare, investing in our public schools, expanding voting options to increase voter participation, ending gerrymandering, reforming the criminal justice system, enacting common-sense gun laws, addressing domestic violence, restoring reproductive rights, rebuilding and maintaining the transportation infrastructure, and much more.

Mike Huber

Ran for: South Dakota House of Representatives (District 14)

Michael Huber ran for the South Dakota State House in District 14, earning 23% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). Huber attended all of his schooling in South Dakota, and worked part-time at his family’s small business as a student. He is a longtime social-justice activist. Today, Huber works as a financial advisor, treasurer for South Dakota Voices for Peace, and mentors inmates through his program, Yoga for Inmates. Huber is a descendant of homesteaders who helped build South Dakota into the thriving place it is today, and of recent immigrants as his mother came to the United States from Denmark in the 1950s. He hopes to continue the pioneering spirit of his great-grandparents by increasing citizen engagement in government, expanding voting accessibility and government transparency, investing in renewable energy sources, supporting local businesses, making the South Dakota criminal justice system fair for all, and offering its children the best possible education. Huber is a member of a UU congregation and is a humanist and atheist.

Margaret Kuipers

Ran for: South Dakota House of Representatives (District 11)

Margaret Kuipers ran for the South Dakota House of Representatives in District 11, earning 22% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). Kuipers is an Emergency Medical Technician and is active in the South Dakota Emergency Medical Services Association. She also works as a Phlebotomist for the Community Blood Bank. Her career includes a variety of work experience including: customer service representative, correctional officer, 911 dispatcher, and as a cattlewomen. Kuipers is seeking office to be a practical voice in the state capital to find common sense solutions to the issues facing her community. Her policy priorities include: protecting reproductive rights, strengthening public education from pre-k to post secondary, supporting equal rights for all, providing access to affordable and quality healthcare, reforming the criminal justice system, ensuring public safety, and increasing government transparency. Kuipers was raised in the United Church of Christ congregation and is an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Texas

David Alcorta

Ran for: Texas House of Representatives (District 50)

David Alcorta ran for the Texas House of Representatives in District 50 earning 22% of the vote in the March 1 Democratic primary. Alcorta has been very politically active in Texas including working as a field organizer for the 2018 Beto O’Rourke senate campaign and serving as a legislative aide for a member of the Texas House of Representatives. He is currently an employee of the City of Austin and helps coordinate the city’s youth career programs. Alcorta says, “”I was raised by a single-mother who, at times, struggled financially. Regardless, she always found a way to provide for my sister and I. I know how difficult it can be for working families in this state to live paycheck to paycheck. My experiences planted a deep desire to create a more just economic and political system to improve the material conditions of the working class.” His policy priorities include increasing the minimum wage to at least $15 an hour, guaranteeing full-time employees the ability to take a minimum of two weeks paid leave, building public housing and increasing the rights of tenants, repealing Texas’ so called “right to work” laws to increase union representation, expanding Medicaid with the goal of establishing a universal healthcare system, and improving our public schools by greatly increasing state funding so there is less reliance on local property taxes. Alcorta is a humanist.

Angi Aramburu

Ran for: Texas House of Representatives (District 122)

Angi Aramburu ran for the Texas House of Representatives in District 122, earning 41% of the vote in the general election. As a wife, mother, entrepreneur and small business owner, community volunteer, and first-generation college graduate, Aramburu has the commitment and tenacity to make things happen and “will not stop fighting until Texas is a place where everyone has an equal opportunity for success.” Her policy priorities include: expanding Medicaid, wielding state power to negotiate lower drug prices, investing in climate-friendly infrastructure and new industries, legalizing cannabis for medical and recreational purposes, preventing gun violence, paying teachers what they deserve, and fully funding public education. As a former PTA president, Aramburu says, “Education funding should be equitable with an expectation that every student receives the same quality education, regardless of where they live.” Aramburu is spiritual, but not religious.

Salman Bhojani

Won: Texas House of Representatives (District 92)

Salman Bhojani won election to the Texas House of Representatives in District 92, earning 58% of the vote in the general election. Bhojani is a successful business owner, attorney, and former member of the Euless City Council. He is seeking this seat because, “We need leadership in Austin that isn’t afraid of the present and the future, that doesn’t run from the rich diversity that is increasingly defining our state. When we give opportunities to every Texan, our state is stronger and our future is more secure.” His policy priorities include: countering voter suppression and gerrymandering efforts, preparing our children for the future by properly supporting public school, fostering a thriving middle class with work environments free of discrimination and harassment, providing access to quality and affordable healthcare, transitioning to clean energy and improving our energy infrastructure, and protecting civil rights and civil liberties. Bhojani is Muslim and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

John Bryant

Won: Texas House of Representatives (District 114)

John Bryant won election the Texas House of Representatives in District 114, earning 66% of the vote in the general election. In the March 1 Democratic primary he came in second with 22% of the vote in a field of five candidates. He won the May 24 runoff election with 62% of the vote and will advance to the general election. Bryant served for nine years in the Texas House of Representatives and then for 14 years in the U.S. House of Representatives. After leaving Congress in 1997, he returned to his law practice and civic engagement in his community. He is running again for the Texas State House “because the threat to our democracy now requires everyone to get off the sidelines and join the fight in the way they can be most effective.” His policy priorities include protecting the democratic process, fighting for reproductive rights, making healthcare accessible and affordable, addressing climate change, advancing human rights and civil rights, and reforming the criminal justice system. Bryant is a member of a United Methodist congregation.

Peter Haase

Ran for: Texas House of Representatives (District 33)

Peter Haase ran for the Texas House of Representatives in District 33 earning 49% of the vote narrowly losing the March 1 Democratic primary. Haase is an engineer who cares deeply about the environment and the future of Texas. He is bringing a new and young voice to Texas politics with practical problem solving skills. He developed his love of the outdoors as an Eagle Scout and has visited over 30 U.S. National Parks. His conservation and environmental policies are designed to ensure that “future generations will have the same opportunity to visit and explore these beautiful parks.” His policy priorities include investing in renewable energy and a modern electric grid, connecting Texas cities with public transit to reduce the use of private automobiles, creating urban recycling and composting programs, maintaining affordable housing by regulating rent increases, protecting reproductive rights, eliminating student debt, fully funding public education, and expanding voting rights. Haase is not religious.

Keith G. Henry

Ran for: Texas House of Representatives (District 23)

Keith G. Henry ran for the Texas House of Representatives in District 23, earning 35% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the March 1 Democratic primary. Commissioner Henry has spent over a decade as a local civic official working on issues of urban planning, affordable housing, economic growth, environmental sustainability, youth programs and education. His career has focused on “fighting for justice and cultivating equitable opportunities for the most vulnerable among us.” He now wants to take his local government experience to the state house. His policy priorities include criminal justice reform, community revitalization, youth development, and ensuring a robust workforce. He is also committed to improving public education, making healthcare accessible and affordable, addressing climate change, and protecting reproductive rights. Commissioner Henry is a Christian and ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Jon Rosenthal

Won: Texas House of Representatives (District 135)

Jon Rosenthal won re-election to the Texas House of Representatives in District 135, earning 57% of the vote in the general election. Rosenthal is an engineer by training so he is “driven to find reasonable, data-driven solutions to the challenges our communities face.” He prides himself on not being a traditional politician, applying his nuts and bolts approach to a multitude of issues, such as access to affordable and high-quality healthcare, common-sense gun reform, high-quality public education, criminal justice reform, clean energy investments to address climate change, and vital infrastructure improvements. In addition, Rosenthal argues that it “has become clear that we have not come as far as we thought, and the fight for equality for ALL must be renewed.” He strongly advocates for communities that have been underserved in the state legislature by fighting against bigotry and discrimination. Raised in a multi-religious family with a Christian mother and Jewish father, Rosenthal is an agnostic.

Dennis Sherrard

Ran for: Texas House of Representatives (District 94)

Dennis Sherrard ran for the Texas House of Representatives in District 94, earning 43% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the March 1 Democratic primary. Having recently retired from full-time work in information technology, Sherrard says, “The experience I gained throughout my career, whether in contracts negotiation, problem-solving or operations management gives me the tools necessary to go to Austin and work for the people in Texas to solve problems. I’m not interested in just talking about problems. I’m interested in actually solving them.” He is running for this seat to change the dangerous priorities of the Republican Texas legislature. Sherrard’s policy priorities include increasing the minimum wage to $15 per hour, making healthcare accessible and affordable, rebuilding our critical infrastructure systems, repealing voter suppression and anti-abortion measures, improving public education, addressing climate change, and reforming the criminal justice system. Sherrard is not religious.

Namrata “Nam” Subramanian

Ran for: Texas House of Representatives (District 147)

Namrata “Nam” Subramanian ran for the Texas House of Representatives in District 147 earning 7% of the vote in the March 1 Democratic primary — finishing 5th in a field of seven candidates. Subramanian is an educator, leader, and advocate who “firmly believes in justice—from economic to healthcare to educational justice. Every person deserves human rights and to be treated equitably in our society.” As a high school math teacher, she is inspired by her students and she has gotten to know and understand the specific needs of Houston’s families. Her policy priorities include improving public education, increasing the minimum wage and access to affordable housing, reforming the criminal justice system and legalizing marijuana, making healthcare accessible and affordable with Medicare for All, and protecting the environment and grid reliability with green energy infrastructure. Subramanian identifies as agnostic.

Aurelia Wagner

Ran for: Texas House of Representatives (District 147)

Aurelia Wagner ran for the Texas State House in District 147 earning 8.5% of the vote in the March 1 Democratic primary — finishing 4th in a field of seven candidates. Wagner is a teacher and served in the U.S. Navy Reserve. Her campaign is about fighting for a better Houston. Her policy goals include establishing a living wage and ensuring pay equity, providing tuition free public higher education, making housing affordable and preventing seniors and low income communities from being forced from their homes, reducing public school class sizes and fully funding public education, offering full-day pre-K and Kindergarten to all children, protecting a woman’s right to choose, removing taxes on feminine hygiene products, legalizing recreational marijuana use, and accepting the Medicaid expansion program. Wagner is an atheist.

Mikal D. Williams

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Texas-14)

Mikal D. Williams ran for Congress in Texas’ 14th District, earning 31% of the vote in the general election. He won the March 1 Democratic primary with 50.2% of the vote. The father of a special needs child, Williams had a long battle to secure the appropriate services for his son. This experience has led him to focus his legal practice to advocate for children and families just like his. Mikal is a cofounder and also serves as general counsel and teaches an on-line medical law and ethics course for a college that is working to “create a world where vulnerable communities have access to a world-class, quality education in the areas of allied health at an affordable price.” His policy priorities include creating middle-class jobs that will stimulate the economy and increase the quality of life for all residents, establishing an affordable universal healthcare system, addressing gun violence, updating our immigration system to ensure that the undocumented are treated humanely, reforming the criminal justice system to eradicate systemic racism, protecting reproductive health choices, and improving public education by increasing funding and teacher training so America will be a world leader in education again. Williams is an agnostic.

Utah

Nate Blouin

Won: Utah State Senate (District 13)

Nate Blouin won election to the Utah State Senate in District 13, earning 69% of the vote in the general election. Blouin’s passion for skiing led him to move to Utah and his love of the outdoors inspired him to a career in promoting the use of renewable energy resources. He is also a very active volunteer in his community. Blouin helps refugees through Salt Lake City’s Know Your Neighbor program, delivered groceries to high-risk community members during the pandemic, and serves on a number of boards and committees addressing education and environmental issues. In addition to reducing Utah’s contribution to climate change, his policy priorities include defending the state’s vote by mail system, making housing affordable and accessible, fully funding our public schools and empowering teachers, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, restoring reproductive rights, protecting the LGBTQ+ community, and enacting common sense gun laws. Blouin has no religious affiliation.

Ashlee Matthews

Won: Utah State House (District 37)

Ashlee Matthews won re-election to the Utah House of Representatives in District 37, earning 56% of the vote in the general election. With 11 years of experience with the Utah Department of Transportation and a co-founder of The Single Parent Project, Matthews champions issues regarding the well-being of working families, such as improving Utah’s air quality, creating affordable childcare and after-school programs, and expanding access to public transportation and ride share programs. In addition, her work focuses on improving livable wages, environmental stewardship, and community support. She has also directly worked with her community by serving as a mentor with the Big Brothers Big Sisters of Utah and a Giving Tree coordinator for the UA Local 140 Ladies Auxiliary. Matthews is an agnostic.

Vermont

Steve May

Ran for: Vermont State Senate (Chittenden Southeast District)

Steve May ran for election to the Vermont State Senate in the Chittenden Southeast District. In the Democratic primary on August 8 he earned 7% of the vote (5th of five candidates), with the top three moving on to the general election. A clinical social worker and staunch advocate for equitable and comprehensive healthcare, May is the founder of The Forum on Genetic Equity, which combats the issues surrounding genetic bias and other gene therapy issues. He has worked extensively in the area of addiction treatment, as well as adoption, infertility, and surrogacy. In addition, he has served as Vice President of the Champlain Valley Central Labor Council and as an Executive Board Member of the State AFL-CIO. His policy priorities include: increasing access to quality healthcare, capping college tuition costs, increasing the state minimum wage, and fighting for paid family leave. May is Jewish and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Richard “Dick” McCormack

Won: Vermont State Senate (Windsor District)

Richard “Dick” McCormack won re-election to the Vermont State Senate in the Windsor District, earning 23% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). He won the Democratic primary on August 8 – four candidates running for three seats. A 33-year veteran Vermont Senator, he currently serves as the Vice Chair on the Institutions Committee, and as a member of the Judicial Retention Committee and Natural Resources and Energy Committee. His previous service includes Senate Majority Leader, Chair of Education Committee, and Co-Chair of Climate Solutions Caucus. A community leader, retired college instructor, and folk singer, McCormack has been involved in a wide-range of community organizations throughout his life. He is a staunch supporter of a high-quality education for both students and adults, environmental sustainability, accessible healthcare, and underserved communities. McCormack governs with reason.

Monique Priestley

Won: Vermont House of Representatives (Orange-2 District)

Monique Priestley won election to the Vermont House of Representatives in the Orange-2 District, earning 61% of the vote in the general election. She won the Democratic primary on August 8 with 73% of the vote. Priestley was raised with the belief that it is one’s responsibility to give back to those in need. She has served over two dozen local, regional, and statewide organizations including serving on the cabinet of EMERGE Vermont. This work has highlighted the importance of public engagement, community and economic development, and rural empowerment. Her campaign focuses on finding collaborative solutions to revitalize small businesses and encourage entrepreneurs, provide accessible housing and childcare, evolve K-12 curriculums, and preserve our environment. She is also passionate about building a creative economy, which is one where storytelling, music, and the arts can thrive. Priestley is an atheist and a humanist.

Barbara Rachelson

Won: Vermont House of Representatives (Chittenden-14 District)

Barbara Rachelson won re-election to the Vermont House of Representatives in the Chittenden-14 District. She was unopposed in the general election. Rachelson is a social worker and has a lengthy track record working for social change. She has over 40 years’ experience working in nonprofit organizations, including over 30 years running them. She is on the board of the national organization, Human Rights for Kids, and recently finished up her term on the ACLU of Vermont’s board. Her time in social work has made her one of the foremost advocates in the Vermont Legislature for the protection of children and vulnerable adults, as well as for more humane treatment of people with mental health or addiction challenges. Rachelson will use her experience as a legislator and continue to advocate to help build a more forward-looking economy, decrease Vermont’s childhood poverty rates, enact sensible gun legislation, protect Vermont’s vast natural environment, reform our criminal justice system, address systemic racism, and protect Vermonter’s privacy rights and consumer protections. Rachelson identifies as a nonreligious Jew.

Mike Rice

Won: Vermont State House (Bennington-Rutland District)

Mike Rice won election to the Vermont House of Representatives in the Bennington-Rutland District, earning 53% of the vote in the general election. Rice is a graduate of the Vermont Law School with a master’s degree in food and agriculture law and policy. He is development director with the Northeast Organic Farming Association, where he works on local and regional projects in food security, food system equity, climate crisis mitigation, pollinator protection, soil health, and farmer support. In the Vermont legislature, Rice will be a strong advocate for racial equity, environmental justice, gender equity, reproductive freedom, and LGBTQIA+ rights. His policy priorities include supporting his rural community by expanding access to quality affordable housing and childcare, increasing workforce training, connecting communities to high speed internet, enacting paid family and medical leave, and addressing the climate crisis. Rice does not identify with any religion, and believes deeply in protecting and strengthening the separation of church and state.

Larry Satcowitz

Won: Vermont House of Representatives (Orange-Washington-Addison District)

Larry Satcowitz won re-election as State Representative for the Orange-Washington-Addison District of Vermont, earning 25% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). He serves on the House Natural Resources, Fish, and Wildlife Committee. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a BA in Philosophy and a minor in Mathematics. After briefly attending graduate school at the University of Vermont, he finished an MS degree in Zoology at Colorado State University where he mostly studied topics related to Ecology and Evolution. He then worked at the Colorado Division of Wildlife before moving to Vermont in 1999 with his wife. Since moving to Vermont Satcowitz has been mostly employed as a high school math teacher, but more recently he has taught computer applications classes at the Vermont Technical College. Along the way he has also worked as a landscaper, cashier, database programmer, and house builder. He is currently a member of the Randolph Selectboard, having been elected in 2017. Satcowitz is a leader for environmental sustainability, economic stability and growth, and quality education for the next generation of leaders. In addition, he advocates for accessible and quality healthcare, livable wages and paid family leave, and criminal justice reform. He emphatically supports a strict separation between church and state.

Robin Scheu

Won: Vermont House of Representatives (Addison-1 District)

Robin Scheu won re-election to the Vermont House of Representatives in the Addison-1 District, earning 36% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). A three-decade resident of Middlebury, Scheu has been an involved member of her community in environmental, education, charitable, and business capacities. As a state legislator, Scheu is focused on a more progressive, inclusive Vermont in which people from all backgrounds and income levels can succeed. Scheu will fight so that all Vermonters can make a “livable wage, receive high-quality affordable health care, get a great education, live in a clean, healthy environment, and retire with security.” To achieve these goals, she plans to implement statewide paid family and medical leave, improve water quality and limit fossil fuels, the creation of safe and affordable housing for working families and seniors, and fund and improve early childhood and public education. She also will work to ensure that all legislation considers racial justice as we work to dismantle structural and institutional racism. Scheu is a Unitarian Universalist and a humanist.

Devon Thomas

Ran for: Vermont House of Representatives (Franklin-1 District)

Devon Thomas ran for election to the Vermont House of Representatives in the Franklin-1 District, earning 16% of the vote in the general election (there are 2 seats in this district). Thomas says he doesn’t have all the solutions, but he does have the desire and experience to work together with his constituents to make positive changes. His policy priorities focus on improving the quality of life by advocating for affordable housing, access to quality education and childcare, livable wages, and building a comprehensive and affordable healthcare system. Thomas brings forward the importance of diversity and the necessary work to help equip our neighbors “to enter into the vital conversations needed to heal our nation’s lingering social wounds.” He aims to push for the kind of community that celebrates one another for who they are. Thomas is a Christian minister and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Becca White

Won: Vermont State Senate (Windsor District)

Rebecca “Becca” White won election to the Vermont State Senate in the Windsor District, earning 23% of the vote in the general election (there are 3 seats in this district). She won the Democratic primary on August 8 – four candidates running for three seats. A former Select Board member and current member of the Vermont House of Representatives, White has been a strong advocate for livable wages, affordable housing and childcare, and accessible and high-quality healthcare. Her work reflects her personal values, particularly with dismantling systemic racism, addressing global warming, and being a champion for reproductive liberty. White is an atheist and is a member of a Unitarian Universalist society.

Virginia

Blaizen Buckshot Bloom

Ran for: Chesapeake (Virginia) Board of Education

Blaizen Buckshot Bloom ran for the Chesapeake (Virginia) Board of Education. He earned 3% of the vote in this contest for 6 school board seats. Bloom is a 2021 graduate of the Chesapeake public school system and was motivated to run because of the failures of the current School Board to implement evidence-based health safety measures and protect the rights of LGBTQ+ students. Bloom currently attends Old Dominion University where they study Ocean and Earth Sciences with the goal of helping preserve our natural environment for generations to come. Their policy priorities include: democratizing processes to ensure there is more cooperation between the students, families, staff, and community with school and city administrators; providing more resources in the schools to ensure that students and their families have the support, resources, and knowledge needed to support mental wellbeing; addressing the shortage of qualified teachers by lessening the stress of the workplace, as well as policies that reward teachers and provide opportunities for advancement and higher education; and, creating a student disciplinary system that focuses on prevention by establishing measure that teach students how to de-escalate and problem solve. Bloom is an atheist and humanist.

Karl Frisch

Ran for: Virginia House of Delegates (District 35)

Karl Frisch ran in a special election for the Virginia House of Delegates in District 35. In the Democratic Caucus on October 8, 2022, he earned 49% of the vote. He is a member of the Fairfax County (VA) School Board where he championed efforts to eliminate literacy gaps, teach accurate history, protect school libraries from censorship, expand access to advanced academics, and protect LGBTQ students. Frisch is also the executive director of Allied Progress, a consumer watchdog organization, where he develops creative and effective campaigns to stand up to powerful corporate interests and their political allies in Washington. He has previously worked for a host of Democratic party committees and progressive advocacy organizations and has helped elect Democratic mayors, state legislators, members of Congress, governors, and senators. He is running for the Virginia legislature to “stand up to the far-right and work every day to protect our world-class public schools, defend reproductive freedom, build an economy that works for everyone, prevent gun violence, take bold climate action, and preserve our democracy.” He is an agnostic.

Jeremy Rodden

Ran for: Chesapeake (Virginia) Board of Education

Jeremy Rodden ran for election to the Chesapeake (Virginia) Board of Education, earning 32% of the vote in the general election for this single seat. Rodden holds a master’s degree in education and has worked as an educator with the School District of Philadelphia, JobCorps, and Together We Can Foundation. He also has experience as a volunteer helping youth as a Court Appointed Special Advocate in the City of Chesapeake and as a coach in the Chesapeake Little League. In addition, he is a member of the school district’s Equity Council and a co-founder of Pride in the ‘Peake. Rodden’s policy priorities include increasing pay to attract the best teachers and staff, protecting students and staff by following accurate and up-to-date health and safety advice, ensuring community participation and transparency in decision-making, and advocating for equitable educational access. Rodden is a humanist.

Washington

Manka Dhingra

Won: Washington State Senate (District 45)

Manka Dhingra won re-election to the Washington State Senate in District 45, earning 63% of the vote in the general election. She is the Deputy Majority Leader of the Senate, Chairs the Law and Justice Committee, and is a member of the Behavioral Health Subcommittee and Ways and Means Committee. She holds a JD from the University of Washington School of Law and since January 2000 has been the Senior Deputy Prosecuting Attorney with King County. Her policy priorities include: improving public education by decreasing class sizes and investing in early learning, reducing traffic congestion and expanding public transit, creating affordable housing, addressing gun violence and improving public safety, increasing government transparency, addressing climate change and embracing new green technologies, protecting reproductive rights, and standing up to hate to ensure equality and inclusion for all members of our community. Dhingra is Sikh.

Julianne Gale

Ran for: Washington State Senate (District 35)

Julianne Gale ran for the Washington State Senate in District 35, earning 45% of the vote in the general election. Gale has played many different roles in her life including, public school teacher, a union construction worker, peer counselor, youth program manager, and an advocate for clean air and water. Gale is seeking office to help her community thrive and become more self-sufficient. She says, “I want us to end our reliance on supply chains, build our own homes, hire our neighbors to work at our small businesses, and support our schools in creating our future leaders.” Her policy priorities include: creating an economy that works for everyone, addressing the climate crisis, respecting tribal sovereignty, championing public schools, protecting reproductive rights, expanding access to affordable and quality healthcare, and increasing access to safe, healthy, and affordable homes. Gale is Jewish.

Lucy Lauser

Ran for: U.S. House of Representatives (Washington-3)

Lucy Lauser ran for Congress in Washington’s 3rd District. Lauser is a trans woman who was raised in rural Washington, the oldest child of a large homeschooling family. She is running for office because “the Republican platform is openly opposed to my survival.” She says, I’m here “to put a human face to the dehumanized transgender threat that some propagandists would have you fear.” She is running on a platform of liberty, equality, equity, and stability. Liberty – where all people have the right to freedom of religious practice, and freedom from religious law, including full bodily autonomy. Equality – in which all people have the right to equal representation and treatment under the law, regardless of their traits or self-expression. Equity – where all people have the right to be supported based on need, not left behind because they’re different. Stability – in which all people have the right to a stable, safe home, and a sustainable economy that works for them. Lauser is an agnostic humanist.

Strom Peterson

Won: Washington State House (District 21-1)

Strom Peterson won re-election to the Washington House of Representatives in District 21-Position 1, earning 67% of the vote in the general election. Peterson, serving in his fourth term, is a strong advocate for affordable housing and renters’ rights, the environment and Washington’s natural resources, common sense gun safety, fully funding public schools, public transportation projects, and addressing the opioid epidemic. Having founded three successful businesses, he also brings a strong perspective regarding the need for a skilled workforce, working condition protections, and infrastructure investments. Peterson has been very involved with community organizations such as the Progressive Animal Welfare Society, Edmonds Center for the Arts, Veterans Plaza Committee, and the Edmonds Community College Boots to Books program. Peterson is an agnostic.

Cindy Ryu

Won: Washington State House (District 32-1)

Cindy Ryu won re-election to the Washington House of Representatives in District 32-Position 1, earning 43% of the vote in the general election. Prior to her election to the State House in 2010, Ryu served as a city councilmember and mayor of Shoreline City, Washington. She was the first Korean American woman mayor in America. Ryu chairs the Community Development, Housing & Tribal Affairs Committee and the Members of Color Caucus. She also serves on the Commerce & Gaming Committee and the Capital Budget Committee. She is a strong advocate for small business, public schools, affordable housing and home ownership, public transportation, environmental and consumer protection, and public safety. Ryu is a Christian.

Jessica Wadhams

Ran for: Washington State House (District 39-2)

Jessica Wadhams ran for the Washington House of Representatives in District 39-2, earning 43% of the vote in the general election. She placed second in the August 2 top-two primary and is moving on to the general election. As a child of parents with drug addiction and mental health challenges, Wadhams saw first-hand how diminishing public resources affect those who are most vulnerable. She is seeking office to give people the best opportunities to succeed so they can live their lives to the fullest. Her policy priorities include: increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, removing barriers for collective bargaining, making public education affordable and accessible, investing in transportation infrastructure improvements, protecting green spaces and addressing climate change, ensuring that everyone has affordable access to quality healthcare and medications, improving police accountability, increasing access to temporary and affordable housing, protecting reproductive rights, and providing more funding for social workers and social programs to prevent homelessness and expand substance abuse programs. Wadhams is not religious.

West Virginia

Dakota Buckley

Ran for: West Virginia House of Delegates (District 58)

Dakota James Buckley ran for the West Virginia House of Delegates in District 58, earning 38% of the vote in the general election. He was unopposed in the May 10 Democratic primary. Dakota says he is “a simple West Virginian with a vision.” As a new father, the urgency of creating a better West Virginia than he experienced was driven home. Dakota says, “I saw first-hand what trickle-down economics did. I saw poverty, pain, illness, and death. I saw teachers struggling to make ends meet. I saw miners constantly going out of work, their parent companies being bailed out only to leave West Virginia high and dry.” His policy priorities include making healthcare accessible and affordable, investing in renewable energy to address climate change, improving public education and teacher compensation, creating both rural and urban public transportation systems, building affordable housing, increasing the minimum wage to a living wage, and expanding workers’ rights to unionize. Dakota is not religious.

Wisconsin

Eileen Daniel

Ran for: Wisconsin State Assembly (District 34)

Eileen Daniel ran for the Wisconsin State Assembly in District 34, earning 38% of the vote in the general election. Daniel is the city council president for the city of Rhinelander. She prides herself on being able to dig down on an issue and get to the root of the problem, and she is not shy about standing her ground when it comes to issues she is passionate about. Her policy priorities include expanding Medicaid, protecting reproductive rights, enacting common sense gun laws, shifting away from a reliance on local property taxes to fund public schools, enacting and enforcing stronger regulations against PFAS contamination of our water supply, increasing the supply of affordable housing, and defending human rights. Daniel says, “It’s unconscionable that in 2022, people are still be treated less than equal based entirely on the color of their skin or their sexual orientation.” Daniel is an atheist.

Francesca Hong

Won: Wisconsin State Assembly (District 76)

Francesca Hong won re-election to the Wisconsin State Assembly in District 76. She was unopposed in the primary and general election. Hong is the daughter of immigrants, a mother, and a small-business owner. Her career in the restaurant industry has made her an advocate for female and nonbinary culinary professionals, and she is a leader and mentor to the wider culinary community in Wisconsin. Hong understands how economic inequality and systemic racism has led to many of the problems facing Wisconsinites today. She is a strong advocate for labor rights, criminal justice reform, affordable housing, investing in public education, accessible healthcare, climate change action, and voting rights. Hong is a humanist.

Jessica Katzenmeyer

Ran for: Wisconsin State Senate (District 5)

Jessica Katzenmeyer ran for the Wisconsin State Senate in District 5, earning 47% of the vote in the general election. She won the Democratic primary on August 8. With a strong background in union organizing, LGBTQ rights, and community activism, Katzenmeyer knows that “when people work together, it is possible to make the world a better place.” In 2019, she lost nearly everything, including her life, in a devastating house fire. If it was not for the Affordable Care Act, she would have owed over $80,000 in healthcare costs. This tragedy increased her motivation to be part of the solution to our ongoing healthcare crisis. In addition to making health and wellness care accessible and affordable to all Americans, her policy priorities include investing in clean energy technology, expanding broadband service, advancing sustainable agricultural practices, helping working families by building a sustainable and equitable economy, fighting for equal rights and protecting reproductive rights, investing in our communities by increasing funding for our public schools and affordable housing, and legalizing cannabis. Katzenmeyer is a proud humanist.

Benjamin Murray

Ran for: Wisconsin State Assembly (District 36)

Benjamin Murray ran for the Wisconsin State Assembly in District 36, earning 29% of the vote in the general election. Murray is a veteran who proudly served in the Navy for 11 1/2 years and deployed 10 times on submarines. In this campaign, he is seeking to cut through the noise and political stereotypes. “Political tribalism,” he says, “is taking control and politicians are taking extreme positions to satisfy the loudest voices. I am not a career politician and I will work with everyone to ensure quality and common sense legislation is passed!” His policy priorities include: ensuring clean water by regulating dangerous PFAS contamination, supporting small businesses to revive small town main streets, helping small and medium farmers stay competitive, improving transportation infrastructure and rural broadband, investing in public education, and increasing funding for rural medical clinics, pharmacies, and rescue squads. Murray is a Christian.

Joey Van Deurzen

Ran for: Wisconsin State Assembly (District 5)

Joey Van Deurzen ran for the Wisconsin State Assembly in District 5, earning 40% of the vote in the general election. Van Deurzen is a lifelong Wisconsinite who was raised by parents who both grew up on dairy farms. He is currently in college studying computer science. He says, “I can milk a cow and code a computer.” He is seeking this office because no one with his values was willing to take on the challenge. “I had two options,” Van Deurzen says, “I can put in the work to run, or complain. I decided it was time to put in the work, to go out and meet with people in every corner of the district, to get on the ballot, and to introduce myself to everyone.” His policy priorities include: investing in our public schools, expanding broadband access, improving our infrastructure resources, making quality health care affordable and accessible, protecting reproductive rights, legalizing marijuana, and ensuring renewable energy sources like solar, wind, and geothermal are accessible to every family. Van Deurzen is an atheist.

Wyoming

Ken Chestek

Won: Wyoming State House (District 13)

Ken Chestek won election to the Wyoming House of Representatives in District 13, earning 60% of the vote in the general election. Chestek is a law professor at the University of Wyoming College of Law and is the Chair of Wyoming Promise, which advocates for an amendment to the Constitution to overturn the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision allowing the use of dark money in political campaigns. His policy priorities include: promoting alternative energy sources to combat climate change, restoring reproductive rights, investing in K-12 education, protecting voting rights, and ensuring public access to Wyoming’s lands. Chestek believes “religious freedom is a shield to protect one’s beliefs, not a sword to impose one’s beliefs on others.” He is a Unitarian Universalist and an ally of the atheist and humanist community.

Ryan Sedgeley

Ran for: Wyoming State House (District 23)

Ryan Sedgeley ran for election to the Wyoming House of Representatives in District 23 earning 24% of the vote in the Democratic primary on August 16. Sedgeley says that, “Education is core to who I am.” A first-generation college graduate, he has earned a master’s degree in environment and natural resources and a juris doctorate. He works for a non-profit organization in development and lives with his wife and their dog, Sierra, in Yellowstone National Park. Sedgeley’s passion for the outdoors, education, the arts, and fellow residents inspired him to run for office by campaigning for reproductive rights, fair and secure elections, accessible and affordable housing and healthcare, free universal pre-K through undergraduate education, the re-electrification of Wyoming through wind and solar energy, tribal sovereignty and reconciliation, LGBTQ+ rights, the legalization of marijuana, abolishing the death penalty, and more state and county services for rural areas. Sedgeley is an atheist.